Notes

[NI0001] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Daron second child of Eric Ralph and Judith Dodge born on the 16th February at Matamata in 1964, while my parents were half-share milking at G.P.Orr's Waharoa farm. We then moved to Springdale still half-share milking and I started school, doing all my primary years there as my Parents bought their farm on No 7 Road in 1971. I then went to Morrinsville College and enjoyed playing Tennis and Badminton. I even got into the Thames Valley Reps in both sports, and I have continued playing for many years. I left school in 1981 and went to work at Nebulite, mainly making window frames. I then went to work for Sheron Relief Farm Service for a period of three years, milking cows and looking after farms for people while they had holidays or were sick, from Reparoa to Wellsford and all places in between. Started contract milking for Brian Innes in 1984, then Ted Monkley driving his verious trucks. Waikato Bitumix came next, followed by Dawes and Sons in Tauranga and a quick spell at Sandfords Fisheries. Started farming again for Colin Gatenby then Fred Cookson, back to Sandfords again for two years then " Oh No ! " back to farming again. We then started half-share milking with youngest brother Mark, milking 480 cows for Fred Cookson again. After two years Mark left to start half-share milking for himself and we started to employ labour till the end of June 1998 when we shifted to a smaller job milking 300 cows on our own. Married Collette Suzanne McKeown on the10th March 1990 and we have two daughters.
Tania Racheal Dodge born 20th September 1994.
Sarah Paige Dodge born 20 July 1996.

[NI0005] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Eric Ralph (always called Ralph) born at 1pm on the 22nd of January 1936 at a Private Home at Arapuni. Third son of Walter and Vera Dodge. Very lucky to be alive as at the age of about four I got in the way of my big brother Harold who was chopping the wood out in the bush with the axe that he wasn't suppose to have,and hit me on my rainhat covered head, splitting it wide open as I moved past him. I raced for home holding the rainhat on my head to try to stop the bleeding. Quick trip in the neigbours Mr Wests car to Te Awamutu and a few stitches and had to stay in hospital over night, and when Mum came to get me,all she could hear was " Their choking me, Their choking me." The reason for this was that a large bandage was wrapped around my head and under my chin to hold it on, I still have the large scar today. Started school at Pukeatua, moved to Hamilton and went to Fairfield, Horotiu, Rotowaro as the family moved around for work, then onto Huntly where I went to High School. The family then moved to Gordonton and I started work part time in the local store, while I helped out at home on the farm. On the move again, this time to Manawaru Te Aroha West, then to Tahuna to Alan Whitechurch's for eight years. Bought my first sports car for 700 pounds in 1957, it was a 1952 Triumph T.R.2. painted English Racing Green. Did a little bit of racing and hill climbing, ran through the timed 1/4 mile at 103 miles per hour. About two years later I traded the T.R. for a red Austin Healy but was never as happy with that. Decided to get serious with Dairy Farming and save some money. Moved to the Paterson Estate at Springdale where I decided to ask a long time friend Judith Green to marry me . So pleased that she did and we were married on the 2nd of December 1961 and we purchased a herd of cows and started half-share milking the 1963 season. Share-milked at Waharoa for three years, then we moved to No 1 Road Waitoa for five seasons. 1971 saw us buy our own farm on No 7 road Springdale where we farmed for 22 years, during this time we had two trips overseas, one to Australia on a camping safari on the east coast and out on Long Island, and the other in1982 to Europe and England where we visited family and collected a lot of this information. Sold the farm in 1993 to live in a mobil home in New Zealand and Australia. July 1998 saw us off to America to Dodge Family Reunions and Dodge Familys for 10 weeks.
We have four children, Joanne 3rd October 1962, Daron Eric 16th February 1964, Jonathon Ralph 25th October 1972 , Mark Walter 7th January 1974.

[NI0007] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
My name is Joanne. I was born the eldest child of Eric Ralph and Judith Dodge on the 3rd October 1962 at Morrinsville at eight minutes past five A.M. I was to become the only daughter with the later arrival of three brothers.
I went to school at Springdale Primary and onto Morrinsville College until the six form. I went to work at Tim's T.V. Service as a Home Appliance Repair Person.
This is where I meet my future husband on a course at Petone Wellington.
We married at my Parents Farm on No 7 Road Waitoa. My husband Richard Grooms and I were married the 7th April 1980. We then went to live in Tokoroa for seven years and had two boys. We then packed up and moved to Australia in February 1987. I worked for four years for Kambrook reparing small appliances.
We then had two more boys.

[NI0008] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
My name is Jonathon Ralph Dodge, and I was born 25th October 1972 at Morrinsville. I'm the second son and third child of Eric Ralph and Judith Dodge. I did all my primary school years at Springdale, then Morrinsville Intermediate and Morrinsville College. I then went to Hamilton Polytech doing Electrical Electonics Computor Engineering, then into the family thing farming, where I was getting up extremely early and getting rid of ragwort, " I hate doing Ragwort !! " I was then off to Australia where I worked as a Technition for Ray W. Communacations, installing radios and C.B. I then went to work for MacDonalds and was fully trained, and I started Dancing. Back to New Zealand to Hamilton and continued my Dancing career at Zaks Night Club. I travelled up and down New Zealand in a Male Review Show. Then I moved to Christchurch with my partner where I worked for Rote 66 Night Club then to Firecats where I won Mr Canterbury Striptease 1995. I have a son Jayson Andrew Douglas Smith born 29th June 1994 at Christchurch Womans at 8.40am on the only day it snowed in Christchurch that winter. I now have a daughter Courtney Jayne Mc Crossan born 21 February 1996, also at Christchurch Womans.

[NI0009] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Mark Walter is the fourth child of Eric Ralph and Judith Dodge. Born at Hamilton then moved back to Morrinsville at five hours old on the 7th of Januray 1974. I had two mothers as my only sister Joanne was twelve years and when Mum and Dad were milking, Joanne looked after me and my brother Jonathon very well. As soon as I was big enough to walk in my gunboots I was off with Dad, doing what ever he did. I went to Springdale Primary School and when I was about eight years old, I got my first three wheel motor bike, a Honda 70. This made it easier to keep up with Dad. I then went onto Morrinsville College. Went to Australia for a winter holiday when I was 15 years old with Mum and Dad and on our return decided to start my career in Dairy Farming. Started as farm manager on my parents farm, then went to work for Mark and Julie Fausett as assistant manager on their 420 cow farm. The next season I returned to 30% sharemilking on my parents farm, sole charge for the 1992 / 1993 season. I then decided to join forces with brother Daron and his wife Collette to milk 480 cows on Cookson Bros farm on the Tahuna-Paeroa Road for 1993 /1995 seasons. I then left Daron to start out 50 % sharemilking for myself with 250 cows.

[NI0015] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Walter was born 5th Sept; 1906 at Manchester Road Timperley Chester. He was the third child of Morten and Bertha Dodge. Walter worked on farms and in stables with horses, one was owned by the Millionaire Mr Brewster. Walter was a keen soccer fan all his life. Walter left England at the age of 18 years for New Zealand where he worked on farms, both sheep and dairy for a few years before he met and married Vera Flewellyn at the age of 25 years. Walter had a brother Ralph Morten and a sister Bertha May.

[NI0016] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
I was born 15th August 1912, weight 3 1/2 lbs to Jessie McLeod at Sherwood Towers Auckland, a Maternity Home owned by Henry and Charlotte Flewellyn who later adopted me into their large family. I made number 13. Before I was 5 the family moved to the Whiranakei Whangarei, into an unfinished house. Dad being a carpenter was able to complete this home. This is where I started school. We use to go to school by boat, which I soon learnt to row. My parents then sold our Whiranakei home when I was about 8 or 9 and bought a two storie home in Whau Valley. It is still there to-day (1995). I then went to Auckland and lived with one of my older married sisters Bertha Small where I completed my school years at Point Chev. My parents then moved back to Auckland when I was 15. This was to One Tree Hill. At this time I went out looking for housework. My first job was to look after an elderly lady who had a stroke, this was for a year. When I was about 17 my parents moved again to Raurona Ave; Royal Oak. I then had a job with Mr & Mrs Levien at St Heliers Bay and was earning one pound a week. He was a Magistrate. It was here that I met Walter Dodge an Englishman on a blind date. I was 18 years old. We were engaged about a year and then we were married at St Johns Anglican Church, Royal Oak on the 24th Dec; 1931. We had been excepted for a farm job in Paeroa, we needed to get a "Special Marriage " licence to be married on Christmas Eve. On our Honymoon we went to Paeroa by boat up the Waihou River , this is where we started our first job together on Mr & Mrs Erwin's dairy farm. Our wages were Three pounds Six shillings a week, we were there about a year. Then it was back to Mothers again while Wally then went looking for work and ended up with the "Married Men" at Waihi, working on the road through the Gorge to Paeroa. I was living at home with my parents after Harold was born, then moved into a one bedroom flat in Waihi. Again we decided to go milking and got jobs at Patamohoe, Te Awamutu, where four more children were born and later to Rototuna were our last child was born. We then moved about through the Waikato milking cows in several small towns till we retired to live in Morrinsville.

[NI0017] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
I was born on the 22nd July 1932, at Royal Oak Auckland. This was at Grandma Flewellyn's Nursing Home. Mum was told by the Medical people that I was blind and not expected to live. I am the eldest of a family of six children, 3 boys then 3 girls. Mum and Dad did a wonderful job in bringing us up. The schools I went to were Pukeatua, Arapuni, Mt. Maunganui and Fairfield in Hamilton. Lastly I went to Horotiu where I received my school leaving Certificate. We lived in Boundary Road Hamilton, which was across the road from the Claudelands Bush. There I went to Scouts. We moved to Grey Street to a farmlet where we milked 10 cows, before and after school. The milk was separated and Dad took the cream to the gate in a small cream-can. I joined " The Boys Brigade " in London Street. Dad worked in Galloway Street Ammunition Works. Dad got a 50 / 50 sharemilking position at Rototuna near Chartwell on Clement's farm. Our neighbours the Chitty's farmed where the now " Chartwell Shopping Complex ," and the Masters family were on the gully side. I loved sports and played Cricket, Rugby and Tennis all around the schools in Hamilton. Three years later Dad sold the herd, I cried my heart out. The cows were sold in the Frankton Sale Yards for 14 Pounds a head. That was May 1947-48.
After leaving school my first job was in the Horotiu Freezing Works for two weeks. I received 11 Pounds. Cam Sullivan asked me to work for him for 4 pounds a week. While there I became very sick and was in Waikato Hospital for a month with a mild form of Polio. All this time Cam paid my wages. Mum and Dad shifted to Ginns Road, Rotowaro in Huntly, June 1948. I worked for them. From there we moved to Gordonton in Sainsbury Road. The family then moved to Allandales in Hunga Hunga Road, Te Aroha. I went to work for Lou Rogers at Elstow, Te Aroha. I had serveral other jobs then in June 1953 Dad asked me to help him on a 29% sharemilking job at Tahuna, working for Allan Whitechurch. I started playing Badminton and there met my future wife to be, Margaret Hampton. I then went to work for Mr & Mrs Hampton. Margaret and I were engaged on 10th September 1955. Margaret loved gardening and went to Massey University to learn more. We were married on 28th April 1956, in the Tahuna Church by a Mr Harold Brown. the reception was in the new Tahuna Memorial Hall. Our photos were taken at Whitechurches old Homestead. Our son Allan was born on the 10th May 1957 at Morrinsville. About 1961 we got a loan and bought our herd for 40 Pounds a head, from Mrs Hampton. One day Dad arrived with an application for Ballat Farms at Rerewhakaaitu, Tirahonga and Reporoa. We applied and drew our first farm at Rerewhakaaitu. It was 152 acres and was on Tarawera Ash land. We moved in on 12th July 1962, fulfilling an ambition to have my own farm by the time I was 30 years old. We adopted our daughter Wendy about 3 weeks after her birth, which was on the 7th January 1967. Ten years later because of very ill health we sold and bought another farm in Manhire Road, Springdale, northwest of Morrinsville. We moved 1st June1977. It was a very wet farm. It was at Manhire Road farm that a wonderful change took place in my life, when I asked Jesus to come into my heart, and He did. This changed me from being like an old man into a young man of 49 years old. It was the best thing that has ever happened to me. We sold this farm in 1982, and moved to our last farm in Maungatapu Road, Morrinsville 1st June 1982. Allan married Sue Deans on 7th January 1982 at Dunedin. About 1990-91 Margaret developed Melenoama Cancer of the Lympth Glands, and on the 5th August 1992, she died and was buried in the Piako Cementry Morrinsville. On Easter Friday April 1993, I met Valerie Traill and on 11th September 1993 we were married. I sold the farm on 20th May 1994 and built a house with a Granny Flat in Hamilton, For Mum Hampton who will be 91 years old in May 1994. We moved in on 23rd December 1994.

[NI0018] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Born so I am told on the 21st of July 1934 at a place called Te Awamutu, they named me Walter Keith, though I have always been called Keith. My schooling began at Arapuni Primary and then to Pukeatua School. Following a family move to Hamilton, my education continued at Fairfield School and was later completed at Horotiu after yet another move. My Secondary School education commenced at Hamilton Technical College, studing engineering, however, another family move saw me attending Huntly High School. This was short lived as they didn't have an engineering course. I decided this was not really my cup of tea, and after a short confrontation with Mum and Dad, I ended up boarding in Hamilton so I could go back to the Techical College. After two years of secondary education I enlisted in the Royal New Zealand Airforce (RNZAF) as a Boy Entrant in the trade of Aircraft Engine Mechanic. In early 1953 I was selected to go to England as a member of the RNZAF Coronation Contingent spending some two and a half months in England. Whilst there I met Dad's sister May, husband Dennis and their son John. They also took me to meet Dad's brother Ralph, wife Eunice and son Morten. Early in 1954 I completed a senior trade course to qualify as an Aircraft Engine Fitter at Woodbourne near Blenheim. It was while at Woodbourne that I met Doreen, my wife to be, and we were subsequently married in Dunedin on the 27th of October1955. We set up our home in Blenheim and our first child, a daughter, Melanie was born on the 3rd of December 1956. In April 1959 we were transfered to Lauthala Bay in Fiji where our second daughter, Rowena was born at Suva. We returned to NZ in October 1961 and were based at RNZAF Base Ohakea near Bulls. Our third child, Michael was born in Palmerston North on the 2nd of August 1963. In June 1969 I went to Florida in the USA to undergo training on Skyhawk Aircraft, soon to be introduced into RNZAF service. We returned to NZ with the Skyhawks in April 1970, a welcome return to the family. In July 1972 I was commissioned as an Engineer
Officer and transferred to Whenuapai at Auckland. I retired from the RNZAF in October 1984 having served for almost 34 years and rising through the ranks from Boy Entrant to Squadron Leader. Since leaving the Airforce I have turned my hobby of old cars into a small business, making and repairing parts for veteran, vintage and classic cars in my workshop at home, and which I continue to the present time ( 1998).

[NI0019] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Ruthe Born 5th June 1937 at Te Awamutu, fourth child and first daughter of Walter and Vera Dodge. Aged two years went rabbit shooting with Youngest brother Ralph aged three and half, causing a family alarm, found safely sometime later down by a lake. Climbed a broom handle at three and half and fell splitting open her head. Started school at Fairfield , going onto Horotiu, Rotowaro, Hamilton Girls High and Te Aroha College as the family moved around Dairy Farming. Objected strongly to starting a third High School ( Morrinsville College) , so her mother offered a letter to allow her to leave school at the age of sixteen and start to wear lipstick. Mum bought my first lipstick NATURAL. Started on my 16th Birthday at Tahuna Supply Store and worked there for six years. I then had six months at Tauhei Store bording with Johanson and Pike Familys. From there I went home to help milk and feed calves, while I worked at the Tahuna Post Office during the day for eighteen months. I always enjoyed playing Badminton and I helped out with cashiering at the Tahuna Picture Theatre. I joined Springdale Country Girls and they often held good old time dances and at one of these I meet Haden William Nicholson who was working in the area as a herd tester for Auckland Herd Improvement. We were Married in Morrinsville on the 18th April 1960 and moved to a new house in Tauranga were we have lived all our working lives. During this time we had three daughters Denise Joy born 6th June1963, Leanne Karen born 7th December 1964 and Shiree Jane born 22nd October 1969.
Since retiring we have bought a Motorhome, rentered out our house and have been seeing the wonderful sights of our beautiful country, in between helping our youngest daughter Shiree and husband Dave to rear thier calves.

[NI0020] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Beryl was born 22nd June 1940 at Te Awamutu the fifth child of Walter and Vera Dodge. On sundays I would go with my father when he took the 20gal milk cans by horse and wagon to the Rototuna Dairy Factory. I started school at Fairfield Primary then went to Horotiu, Rotowaro, Manawaru and then Tahuna Primary school as the family moved around Dairy farming. I worked at home helping with the milking and cooking at Alan Whitechurch's then the Paterson Estate at Springdale where I started painting by numbers. I decided that I liked painting so I had some lessons with Violet Watson, then progressed with Mr Jenkins who bought out my real talent. My painting career was established. I entered a competition for local painters to paint a scene of the Kaimai Range to celebrate the opening of the Kaimai Rail Tunnel. I Won. My painting now hangs in the Goverment's Vogel House in Wellington. I have won other competitions and have sold many, many paintings to overseas visitors from England, U.S.A. Australia and many all over New Zealand. I now have a Studio at home in Morrinsville to display my paintings, and I'm on a visiting list for Bus Tour Groups to our local area from all round New Zealand.

[NI0021] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
I am the youngest of six children of Walter & Vera Dodge. I was born in 1947 in the Hospital that was known as C.J. (Campbell Johnson) in Hamilton. I started my years at school at Manawaru, just out of Te Aroha, I was there for one year, then my parents moved to another farm at Tahuna. It was here that I spent the rest of my primary school years. During my first year at college my parents moved to No 8 Road at Springdale, where I completed 3 1/2 years at Morrinsville College. I left to become a land girl for my parents. It was during these years that I met and married Peter Werder on the 29 April 1967. We sharemilked on Peter's fathers farm then brought it a few years later, where we are still living today. We have two daughters.

[NI0025] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
I was born on the 7th January 1967 at Rotorua where I was Adopted at seven days by Harold & Margaret Dodge. I attended Lake Rerewhakaitu Primary where my parents had thier Dairy farm, until they sold and we moved to Te Puninga and I finished my Primary schooling, going onto Morrinsville College and then Tauranga Girls High. I gained a Certificate in Fashion Design, through International Correspondence School. I have moved several times for jobs living in the following areas; Dargaville , Kaiwaka, Hamilton and Te Aroha.
Married David Begbie 9th May 1998.

[NI0027] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Dec 3rd 1956 - Arrival date of first Grandchild - "Its a girl".
Schools.
Primary - Bulls School, Bulls.
- Clifton School, Bulls.
Secondary - Queen Elizabeth College, Palmerston North.
-Massey High, Auckland.
Attained School Cert; in English, Bookeeping, Typing.
Sixth Form Cert; and various Typing Exams.
Jobs.
Left school and worked as typist for,
Andrews Patten & Cartwright, (Chartered Accountants)
Sedon & Associates - John Ballard (Chartered Accountants)
Ballande N.Z. Ltd ( Import / Export Company )
Personal.
Met Clive Phillips in 1977 on a blind date arranged by mutual friend.
Married October 18th 1980 at Hobsinville Base Chapel
Clive and I have been self employed for the past 13 years. We grow standard carnations in glasshouses on our Waimauku property.

[NI0028] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Rowena was born 14th October 1959 in Suva Fiji, while her parents Walter Keith and Doreen Dodge were serving in the Royal New Zealand Air Force for 2 1/2 years. Started school at Bulls Primary, then Clifton Primary, Whenuapai Primary, then onto Massey High School and finally onto one year at Auckland University.
Rowena was invited to a local gathering at a friend, of a friends house in Whenuapai. Whenuapai Village not having much nightlife, this seemed like a good idea. The pool table was abandoned and the idea of a drive ended under the Greenhithe Bridge. A blue Holden appeared with two occupants. One Paul Albert Coleman, the other his girlfriend. After a short while the blue Holden left to return with only one occupant, Paul. The girlfriend disposed of, left Paul and Rowena to bridge the gap for the evening.
" Abridged Version ." Picked up under the Upper Harbour Bridge. Did trade! ( Paul version as if you couldn't guess.)
Married 4th March 1978 at St. Marys Church Avondale.
We Have three children Renee Marie 28th July 1980, Jason Brett 28th February 1983, Lizette Amy 6th September 1984.

[NI0029] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
" At last a boy " they said on the 2nd of August 1963, when the first cry from son Michael was heard by Keith and Doreen Dodge.
In the following years I attended Clifton Primary School in Bulls and then to Whenuapai School when the family moved to Auckland in 1972. After completing primary school I then moved on to secondary school, for the remainder of my schooling at Massey High School. After completing my sixth form year I had obtained school certificate and University entrance qualifications. Next came a full time year at Auckland Technical Institute studing towards an N.Z.C.E. in Mechanical Engineering. At the end of 1981 I obtained a job with Air New Zealand as an Aircraft engineering apprentice and spent the following five years based in Christchurch with occasional postings to Wellington and Auckland during this time. In 1987 I completed my apprenticeship with a Trade Certificate and a Civil Aviation Aircraft Enginers Licence. Later that year I purchased my house soon to become our home when I married Fran Stamler on the 7th March 1992.
My hobbies have included racing Jet Skis, restoring Motorcycles and more recently collecting and restoring Italian cars. At the end of 1992 Fran and I purchased our own business Recycling Printer Ribbons and have now expanded to other printer types.
I am still working at Air New Zealand and currently I compile cost estimates and quotes for customer engine overhauls. Our home now becomes a " family " with the arrival of Selina May on the 14th January 1995 . The property was extended to include a Large garage to store the Hobby toys. On the 25th September 1996 came the arrival of Jamie Patricia .

[NI0031] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
I Denise Joy Sanne (Nee Nicholson) was born 6th June 1963 in Tauranga. Growing up the eldest of the girls was a pretty responsible Task, needless to say my younger sibling proteges have all turned out very well.
After going through the usual school chanels, I left school at the end of 1979 with U.E. under my belt, to start work at the Greerton Post Office Tauranga, which not only provided me with a job but a means to a year long O.E. which was just great seeing different places and meeting relatives in England.
A Husband was another "perk" of the job. I met Gavin and we married in 1988.
( Yes he was my Boss ! ) I've since left. He's still there, and now I work harder than ever looking after our three precious children, Chenay seven, Courtney five, Nathan two. We have just built our first new home February 1998. Our children are our biggest past-time. Our other interests would be our Baptist Church, family and friends and any other out-door activities.

[NI0032] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Hi, My name is Leanne Grant, this is my Life so far......1998. I was born 7th December 1964 a very large baby for my mother at 8lb 3oz, also a very blue baby, which has given rise to many a disparaging remarks about My I.Q., and things weren't helped any further by being dropped at a latter date by my big sister !. I suppose I'm lucky to have something to blame my indiscretions on !.
I attended Greeton Kindegarten where I graduated with honours to Greerton Primary School. Progressed to Tauranga Intermediate for form 1 and 2 and concluded form 6 at Tauranga Girls College, where I applied and received my first job as a Receptionist Secretary for G.W. Taylor Industries, a local roofing manufacturing company. I met Gavin Grant and we were married on 15th March 1986 at St Enochs Church. Continued my job at Taylors where 5 years later I was promoted to Order Entry Clerk dealing with Customers and Builders ordering roofing requirements. That chapter now concludes after 10 years of work to enter another Career as Executive Housewife and Mum, to Kayla Janelle Grant our first daughter born 1 July 1992 at 6lb 11oz a surprise and rushed delivery !. Jenna Lee Grant was born five years later on 28 August 1997 7lb 4oz.
Gavin continues to work for Taylor Roofing as a roofing contractor, and My last few years have been taken up with Kids, Canines, Cows and Cats. WE own 26 acres and rear beef stock cattle. Well this is where the plot ends so far , you'll have to tune in for the next exciting eposide.

[NI0033] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
I am the youngest born to Haden & Ruthe Nicholson and have two sister Denise & Leanne. I was born in Tauranga -New Zealand where I completed my schooling and moved to Rotorua when I was 17 years old to commence my Registered Nurse Training. Upon successfully completing my training I worked for one year at Rotorua Hospital before heading to England where I nursed for 1 year and traveled around Europe. I came home in 1993 after 18 months away and and went to Whakatane and managed a resthome/ hospital until being accepted into Tauranga Hospitals Intensive Care Unit and finallywas able to nurse in my home town close to my family.......but it didn't last for long. One of my nursing friends arranged a blind date in September and by November I was engaged to a wonderful man David Ross. We were married in the following April 95 and moved to Gore where we are still Sharemilking 500 cows in West Otago - South Island and am the Senior District Nurse in Tapanui.

[NI0035] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
I am the oldest daughter of Peter and Carolyn Werder. I was born on the 6th June 1973 at Waikato Womans Hospital in Hamilton, exactly ten years to the day after my Mum's sister had her first daughter, as you see my Mum and her oldest sister have their birthday's on the same day also. I've lived in Springdale all my life, and went to Springdale School then onto Te Aroha College for five years.
At the age of 18 I left home and College and went to live with Anthony Pollock at Kiwitahi. Here we had our first daughter Stephanie Ann. In June 1992 we moved to Gordonton to contract milk for Ron and Betty Ladd for three years in which time we got married and had our second daughter Amy Louise. In June 1995 we moved again this time to start half-share milking for Joy and Murray Petry at Tatuanui with 212 Jersey cows, and we had another daughter Emma Jane.

[NI0036] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
I am the youngest daughter of Peter Charles and Carolyn June Werder. I was born at 2.30pm Monday the 2nd of August 1976 in Waikato Womans Hospital in Hamilton. I have lived in Springdale all my life and attended Springdale School till 1990 then went on to Te Aroha College for four and a half years. At the age of 17 years, I left home to work for my cousin's Daron and Mark Dodge to be their housekeeper. After one year and three months I left there and moved back home to work for W.D.F.F. ( Womans Division Federated Farmers ) which is a home care agency. I did a variety of work for young and old. During my time working for W.D.F.F. I became involed with the elderly people, so decided I would further my qualifications and do a coarse in " Care for the Elderly. " While doing voluntary work in Kenwyn Home in Te Aroha ( A home for the elderly. ) I was offered a full time position, working in the special care unit where I am still working two years later, ( 1998 )

[NI0037] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Morten Dodge's Will, dated 27 May 1920, Osbourne House, Beaufort Avenue, Brooklands, Cheshire.
To my three children Ralph, May, Walter wit; Edith Trestram, of 36 Coupland Street, Manchester. Ethel Barber, of 1 School Road Stretford.
Affidavit of due execution filed 7 April 1921.
Admin with Will was granted of Guardian of Ralph, May, Walter the residuary legatees and devisees. Three Hundred and Seventy Three Pounds, Eight Shillings and Eleven Pence.

[NI0056] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Will of Morten Dodge,
Last Will and testament of Morten Dodge 5th June 1919, of Lingard Road Northenden, Manchester, Gent.
Witness by A.G. Lawson; A.H.D. Lawson 18 Tib Lane Manchester.
Appoint sons Harry, William and John Dodge executors. Direct payment of debts especially sums of One Hundred Pounds each owing to me by sons William and John which I received on their behalf from their Grandmother estate. Legacy Twenty Five Pounds Free of duty to daughter Annie Goodier. I direct that the indebtedness of my son Morten be reduced to Fifty Pound to be deducted from his share of the estate. ( If share insufficient I forgive him the balance) The rest real and Personal to Harry, William and John upon trust to sell and convert into money to pay legacies. (no time set ) Divide among children Annie Goodier, Carrie Wadsworth, Harry, Fred, Morten, William, John and children of my late son Charles. ( His children to take 1 equal share. )
Probate 2nd September 1922 to Harry, William and John. Seven Hundred and Eighty One Pounds Fifteen Shillings.

[NI0203] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Eliza was the 3rd daughter (5th Child) of Charles and Elizabeth Kingstone & was born in Sydney on 21 August 1845. She was only four months old when the family settled in Tasmania. Although Eliza was to have nine brothers,she was the only surviving daughter of Charles & Elizabeth until she was nearly 18 years of age. Her three sisters, Ellen, Helen & Louisa died as babies, & her youngest sister, Mary Jane, was born in 1863. Eliza probably spent all of her single life helping her mother rear the family. Her singature is on the marriage certificate as a witness to the marriage of her brother, William Kingston to Ellen Barwick at Oatlands in December 1867. On 25 feb 1869 she married William Thomas Dodge, who was the 3rd son & 9th child of Ralph & Charlotte (nee Morris) Dodge of "Lovely Bottom",Carlton. Eliza & William lived at "Lovely Bottom", where their Family of eight children were born. The family later moved to Macrobies Gully, then about 1908 moved to Cascade Road, Hobart, where Eliza died on 28 December1913. Eliza & William Dodge & three of thier children, Stuart, Florence & Elsie, are buried in the same grave at Cornelian Bay Cemetery, & their names are on a headstone that marks the site.

[NI0257] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Athol was the eldest child of Percy & Dora Dodge . He was at Macquarie Plains waiting for hop-picking to start & decided to have a swim in the river. He dived in, but did not surface & was drowned in his 17th year.

[NI0258] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Elsie was the youngest child of William and Eliza and lived in the family home all her life. She was the last surviving child of William and Eliza.

[NI0299] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
William Thomas Dodge Commission book (wo 25/34) showed him a gentleman, Dated 27th October 1779. Next inspection returns for the 45th Regiment 1781 found him age given as 16, making date of birth 1764 or 1765. Baptismal record 1764 at Strood, Kent. 1782 William Dodge, Reference. War office 97 Chancery Lane, London Army records of individuals. Lowest officer rank Ensign ( discontinued ) Unit 45th Reg; of Foot, Coxheath, Maidstone Kent. Sept 12 1789. William Thomas Dodge sailed from Spithead, England on the stores ship " Guardian " which hit an Iceburg off Cape Horn. Transferred to the convict ship " Lady Juliana " and arrived at Port Jackson in 1802 as a soldies.
Record of William Dodge at Norfolk Island.
Arrived August 1790. Off Stores 10th December 1791. Settlers List 21 July 1792. On Stores Civil List 10th December 1791. Departed 8th August 1795 per " Fancy " for Port Jackson.
Hobart Town Cencus 1819. Ralph Dodge born Norfolk Island, "Off Stores."

[NI0345] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Robert was the eldest child of Eliza & William Dodge & was born on 6 -1-1870 . As a child he suffered head injuries when he was tipped from a chase-cart in which he was plating. He became a market gardener at Cascades & then at Derwent Park. He lived in Tregear Street, Moonah with his sisters, Florence & Elsie. Stuart died on 4-5-1956.

[NI0351] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
William was second son of William & Eliza, and as a youth in the 1880's he was an apprentice at Travers Coach Building Works in Elizabeth Street, North Hobart & learned the trade of blacksmithing & wrought-iron work. He made a model of a single furrow mouldboard plough as an example of his work, & this now belongs to Percy's daughter Mrs Mavis Stevenson, & is a beautiful piece of workmanship.

[NI0499] Samuel was out in Singapore as a Civil Engineer. Samuel and his family went out to New Zealand in 1905 and returned to England (minus Basil, who stayed behind in New Zealand) in 1928.

[NI0500] Edith went out to Singapore to marry Samuel. Edith returned to England in, for Marjorie's birth.

[NI0501] Marjorie returned with her family to England in 1928.

[NI0502] Basil stayed in New Zealand when his family returned to England in 1928.

[NI0503] Kenneth went to school in England when the family returned there in 1928.

[NI0530] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
I was born in California where I lived until I was two and half years old. My father ( Jack ) was a retired navy diver now rancher and my mother ( Betty ) was a nurse. We immigrated to N. Z. and lived in Bethlehem, ( Tauranga ) on a Poultry farm. Most of my schooling was in Tauranga and Katikati and I left school at 17 to become a dairy farm cadet in Te Puke. I trained as a cadet for 3 years until being acepted into Massy University where I completed a 1 year Diploma in Agriculture. I then returned to the Bat of Plenty and was a Herd Manager for 3 years and then took on a 50/50 Sharemilking position for another 3 years. Both my parents had passed away at this stage and my brother Stephen was in Missionary training school in Singapore. In my third year shiremilking I met Shiree Nicholson whom I married in the following fall and that winter we moved to Gore for a challenging experience sharemilking - we now reside in West Otago.

[NI0588] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Letter from Robert states that his father Frank John Dodge, died when he was only 13 years and both Franks parents died before he was born. Frank had one sister who died (unmarried) in 1950 and a brother who was killed in France in 1915. The information that he gave me is largely what he could remember from his mother , who died in 1977, and partly guesswork.

[NI0593] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
James Dodge, an ex Royal Navy man born 1888 in London, married Violet according to the marriage certificate was son of David, a packing case manufacturer and Regina Frettkau, both already deceased before 1928. There was no issue of the marriage. Sent to me by Joan McQuade 5 leane Ave,
North Glenelg, South Australia, 5045.

[NI0675] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
Dear Mrs Dodge I'm Sorry I can't help you very much re Dodge family. My Uncle Graham Fortescue Weatherhead who was in world war 1 Stayed in Yeovil Som England with his relatives Dodge and ended up marrying Rosina Elizabeth Dodge who was his cousin on the Chislett side I think, or it could have been on the Stagg relative side. I have not been able to trace how the relationship worked out. They married at Yeovil, 1 Feb;1919 and she had a sister Hilda, who married Hereward Wagner. they lived in Quala Lumpar Malay and another sister married a Yelverton. I forget her name, she died on boardship going to England I think. Hoping you can throw some light on this family.
Yours Sincerely Doris Schilg ? (I think) 23 Troon Ave, Seaton 5023
Dated 29 March 1995.

[NI0873] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
The earliest mention we can find of Ralph is in the Hobart Town Gazette of 27 March 1817, where his name appears in a list of Settlers supplying fresh meat to the Commissariat Stores at Hobart Town. His property at Carlton was know as Ferry Farm. On 5th July 1824 Ralph Dodge 32 Bachelor Free, was married by banns to Charlotte Morris, 20 Spinster Free at St Davids Church Hobart Town. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. William Bedford and the witnesses were W. Morris and Elizabeth Eddington.
Ralph Dodge was a man to be remembered, not only because they named a town after him, but because he had a horseback mail run from Port Arthur to Richmond, and several farms. Ferry Farm was originally 300 acres. Ralph's house built 1830 with bricks he himself made in his backyard. The house still stands on Ferry Farm, a few steps from where remains of his rowing-boat ferry jetty still poke out of the water. the house is still occupied by Barbara Reardon, Great grandaughter of Ralph. ( 1997)
Ralph and his Ferry will always be Remembered.
Old Ralph stood at the bow of his ferry and hollered " All Aboard ". Mother Brown with baby perched on her hip, Farmer Green from up at Dunalley, and young George Smith who was after a job in Hobart Town, clambered over the end of the jetty. Ralph pulled hard on the oars, and the ferry slid away and towards the white sands of Seven Mile Beach, just across the water. The passengers had been walking since sun-up, now it was past noon. They'd come over from Bream Creek and Dunalley to Dodge's place for the ferry trip across to Sandy Point at the end of Seven Mile Beach. They would spend the rest of the day walking along the beach and into Bellerive. It was the shortest and cheapest route.

[NI0926] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
One of his grandsons, Samuel Brickhill Dodge (b.1877) emigrated from England to New Zealand sometime before 1922. He was still alive in N.Z. in 1939 with 3 children (Peter, Marjorie, Basil, James Mathew - three of the four were his; the fourth was a son or daughter of a brother James Horsfield Dodge who possibly also emigrated to N.Z.

[NI1042] [Judy Ralph.FTW]
William Dodge of Offerton's Will Proved 1729.
Gives his land in Offerton and Stockport to his son Robert and male issue. If no male then to son Francis and his male issue. If he have no male issue to his son James and his issue male or female. Gives his ..........to his son Robert, he paying One Hundred Pound to the executors for the use of his ( William's ) two youngest children James and Martha twelve months. His ......... in Offerton held under Mr Bradshaw he gives to his son Francis also Forty Pound out of his personal estate. Gives the remainder of his personal estate to his loving wife Hannah and his two youngest children James and Martha. Directs also that his wife shall have liberty to dwell in his house at Offerton so long as she remains unmarried. Appoints Hannah Dodge and Henry Baruls his executors. Proved under Four Hundred and Seventy Pound Seventeen Shillings and Four Pence.

[NI1621] Residential Address at Birth - 17 Swans Ghyll, Priory Road, Forest Row, East Sussex, England
Born at The Princess Royal Hospital, Haywards Heath, West Sussex, England
She left England with her family at the end of August 1999, they went to Zimbabwe staying first with her Dads parents for a month and then till the end of February 2000. In October 1999 the family joined her Dads family on holiday in Port Alfred, South Africa.
In February her mom and dad went on to Australia and Rachel flew out with Lylie Thorne at the beginning of March.

[NI1623] I was born in Ndola, Zambia in 1966.

I moved to Zimbabwe (then Rhodesia) with my family on 1 May 1973. We moved to Harare (then Salisbury) staying first in the suburb of Avondale then moving to Northwood.

I attended Avondale Primary, then when my family moved I went to Groombridge Primary.

I attended Vainona High School and then after a years break did my A levels at the Zimbabwe Theological College in Bulawayo.

I went back to Harare and met and married Lesmeri in 1991.

We moved to England in 1996, with the intention of using it as a stepping stone somewhere else.

I worked as a Computer Operator for Petroleum Exploration Computer Consultants, for a few months in 1997-8 I was based in Assen in The Netherlands.

In 1998 I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and they decided to go to Australia.

We left England in August of 1999 returning to Zimbabwe to spend Christmas and New Year with our families before going on to Australia.

In 1999, I became a volunteer member of staff with the Dodge Family Association and began writing articles for the Dodge Family Journal the same year. My first article The Dodges and South Africa appeared in the September/October issue that year. In 2000 I was asked to write a regular column reflecting the internationalism of Dodges.

On February 15, 2000 Les and I flew on to Australia with Les' mom following 2 weeks later with Rachel.

In 2002 we bought a plot of land in Tapping in Perth and built a house there. This was the first home we had ever owned.

[NI1629] Les moved with her family back to Zimbabwe, then Rhodesia, after the death of her mother in 1973.
She went to South Africa after completing high school to study nursing, returning to Zimbabwe upon completion.
She and Craig moved to England, temporarily, in 1996. They decided, after Craig got sick, in 1999, to move back to Australia.
They went to Zimbabwe in August to spend Christmas and New Year there with their families, in February they went onto Australia.

[NI1635] Baron von Putt Kamer owned a castle in Germany. - from 'Rhodesia's Pioneer Women (1859-1896)' by Jessie M. Lloyd

[NI1638] Newspaper article -
The Late J. G. Gilfillan
W. I. S. D. writes:-
The Waterberg district suffered a great and irreparable loss in the death on September 13th, after a painful illness, of Mr. John Charles Gilfillan, affectinately known throughout the northern districts and in farming circles in the Transvaal as "Oom Jack."
The late Mr. Gilfillan was a descendant of the 1820 Settler stock of that name, a family as widely and prominently represented in South Africa today as any which came to its shores in 1820. He was a brother of Mr. W. H. Gilfillan, for many years Surveyor-General of the Transvaal.
"Oom Jack" was born in the Middelburg District, Cape Province, in 1866, being sixty-two years of age at his death. He was educated at St. Andrews College, Grahamstown, and he came to the Transvaal in 1888, being one of the early pioneer prospectors in the low veld of the eastern and northern Transvaal.
Those were stirring times when prospectors and hunters lived a man's life on the veld, and many were the yarns of hunting and adventure which "Oom Jack" used to narrate. He suffered much from malarial fever in the low country, which somewhat impaired his health. In the early nineties he took up dairy farming at Lynwood, just ouside Pretoria, and in 1896 he married kate Pienaar, daughter of Mr. J. J. Pienaar, a descendant of the Hugenot emigrant of that name who came to the Cape in the early days of its history. He had give daughters, all of whom survive him. Mrs Gilfillan is a niece of Mr. Pienaar, the grand old man of Parys. The late "Oom Jack" was very proud of being an Old Andrean, and had a very wide circle of friends among the older past students of his alma mater. In 1905 he came up to the Waterberg district to start ostrich and cattle farming, and maize and citrus growing, on what was theb bare veld at "Zandfontein," losing heavily upon the collapse of the feather industry. He had at one time the largest and most flourishing citrus orchards in the Transvaal, having planted every tree himself, and it was a severe blow to him when the whole of it was destroyed by the Government owing to the appearance of citrus canker. "Oom Jack" came up smiling after every reverse, however, and devoted his energies to dairying and maize growing, being at his death one of the most prominent farmers in those lines in the Waterberg district. He came of farming stock from the Cape Colony and was most thorough in his methods, his ripe experience being of the greatest advantage to his numerous Milner settler friends on the Springbok Flats, who made full use of it in the early days when they first settled there.
The finger of "Oom Jack" can be traced throughout the phenomenal development of the Waterberg district, more especially of Warmbaths and the southern area during the past quarter of a century, and his force of characher and forcible and direct method of expressing his convictions made him perhaps the best known and most popular man among all classes of the population of the district. He left "Zandfontein" one of the best developed farms in the Waterberg. The old-time hospitality of "Zandfontein" was proverbial, and its large dining hall seldom lacked a throng of guests.
"Oom Jack" was a prime mover in the organisation of most of the farmers associations in the Waterberg being for many years chairman of the Southern Waterberg Farmers' Association and also president of the Waterberg District Farmers' Union. He was a member of the executive of the Transvaal Agricultural Union, and on its standing committee up to his death, and his last conscious effort a few hours before he passed away was to dictate a telegram of encouragement to the last T.A.U. congress. His advice and experience was invaluable to the T.A.U. and it was freely availed of by both ministerial and official circles of the Government, few sessions of Parliament ending without "Oom Jack" being summoned to Cape Town to represent the opinion of Transvaal farmers. It is well known that it was the state of his health alone which prevented his election to the highest office in the T.A.U. of which he was at one time a vice-president. Sympathetic reference was made at the present sitting conference of the Union to "Oom Jack," and his untimely death will be a sad blow to that body. He had a unique gift in the management of native and coloured labour, although his methods were of the firmest; and while he never called in the aid of officialdom and the law in the settlement of labour troubles it took much to reconcile any of his numerous native squatters to an order from "Mamantane"to quit his farm. Perhaps one of the best tributes "Oom Jack" will receive will be the sincere emotion and grief expressed to me by his large body of native retainers as they passed out of the death chamber. Such tributes are only given by natives to men of real force of character.
"Oom Jack" hald a peculiar niche in the affection and esteem of Waterbergers which no one else can fill, and his passing will leave an abiding void amongst us, especially to those os us who claim the honour he highly valued - of being Old Andreans and 1820 Settler descendants of whom we looked upom him as being the best type.
To his sorrowing widow and daughters the hearts of the Waterberg will go out in affectioate sympathy. "Au revoir, Jack. Slaap gerus ou maat."

[NI1646] Raymonds brother Johannes Gerhardus Strijdom was the President of South Africa from 1954 - 1958.

[NI1653] The first Gilfillan to come to South Africa was William Frederick Anderson, second son of Lieutenant John Gilfillan and Elizabeth Bridges.
He was born on January 27, 1796, at the time his father, Lt. John Gilfillan, of Major Grant's Company of Invalides, was in charge of the garrison of Elizabeth Castle, Jersey Island.
Some weeks later, the second son of King George III of England, Prince William Frederick, Duke of York, who was Commander-in-Chief of the British Army, made a tour of inspection of Jersey Island and attended the christening of the new baby on February 20, 1796.
There is a story in the family that the Duke agreed to be a godfather and as a christening present, gave the baby a commission in the Duke of York's Own Rifles which afterward became the 60th Rifles Regiment.
Certainly the boy was to bear the names of William Frederick after the Duke of York and Anderson after another godfather, Major Robert Anderson.
In 1812, at the age of 16, William came to South Africa as an ensign with his regiment, the 60th Rifles, and returned to England with the regiment at the end of 1818.
South Africa evidently had attractions for William and on November 4, 1819, when residing in Regent Street, Westminster, London, he applied to the Secretary of State for Colonies for a free passage in one of the transport ships about to convey English settlers to the Cape.
His letter reads as follows:
Sir
I, having served for many years in the frontier of the Cape of good Hope as an officer in the Army, since when I have been placed on half pay, and being desirous of returning to the Cape to settle in the interior, for which my funds are altogether inadequate, I beg you may be graciously pleased to grant me a passage with the settlers now on the point of going.
I have the honour to be, etc.
W. Glfillan, H. P. Lieutenant 60th Regiment.
The request was granted and so William and his younger brother Adam left England and their family for ever.
Adam had been persuaded to come out by his brother and he was a genuine settler-member of the Thornhill party while William as a half-pay ex military officer, does not appear in the official settlers list.
They spent over three months on the voyage out, in the company of the Thornhill family who were the leaders of the settlers party in the Zoroaster sailing ship in 1820.
The leaders of the party, Christopher Thornhill Thornhill, 47, of Thornhill, Yorkshire, left estates in Cumberland and brought with him his wife, Dorothea Mounsey, 35, their two sons, Christopher, 8, and John, 15, and their two daughters, Mary Francis, 10, and Anna Margaret, 13.
During the long voyage out both William and Adam had fallen in love with the young Anna and she returned William's affections much to the disappointment of Adam who swore that he would marry the first pretty girl he saw after landing.
Transferred, once more, to small boats and rowed ashore, they lived in tents near the beach until wagons, hired from the Dutch farmers in the Zwartkop Valley, arrived and the party was moved from Reed River Post by way of Kowie Pass and Bathurst to it's location between the Kowie and Rufane rivers.
William and Anna were married in May 1821 at Bathurst by the Rev. William Shaw and set up home on land which William acquired adjoining the Thornhill property. They built a house and started farming in 1822 while in that year their first child was born, subsequently followed by 12 more children, all of whom with the exception of one who died in infancy, marred and had families of their own.
When the Albany Levy was formed in Grahamstown in October 1822, for the self-protection of the settlers, Lieutenant W. F. A. Gilfillan was one of the officers.
In 1826 William was granted a farm on the Karega river, he named if 'Glenfillan'. The house was burned down at the commencement of the 6th Kaffir War in December 1834.
In 1837 William was appointed the first Resident Magistrate and Civil Commissioner at Cradock.
In the Kaffir War of 1850 William was on the board of Defence and later took the field in command of the Cradock Burghers.
In 1852 William was elected Member of the Legislative Assembly for the District. The bridge over the Fish River at Cradock was named the Gilfillan Bridge in his honour and retains the name till this day although a second bridge over the Fish River has recently been opened.
William died in 1855 and the inscription on his tombstone in the Cradock cemetery reads:
Sacred to the memory
of
William Frederick Anderson Gilfillan
born 27-1-1796
died 4-9-1855
The deceased came to this country in 1812
an ensign in the 60th Rifles.
Returned to England about 1819 and in 1820
came out as a military settler on half pay.
During the war of 1855 he commanded a
company of Levies and at it's conclusion
was appointed Commandant and Resident
Magistrate of Cradock which office he held
until his death.
and of his widow
Anna Margaret Gilfillan
(born Thornhill)

[NI1655] The first Gilfillan to come to South Africa was William Frederick Anderson, second son of Lieutenant John Gilfillan and Elizabeth Bridges and brother of Adam
Adam had been persuaded to come out by his brother and he was a genuine settler-member of the Thornhill party while William as a half-pay ex military officer, does not appear in the official settlers list.
The leaders of the party, Christopher Thornhill Thornhill, 47, of Thornhill, Yorkshire, left estates in Cumberland and brought with him his wife, Dorothea Mounsey, 35, their two sons, Christopher, 8, and John, 15, and their two daughters, Mary Francis, 10, and Anna Margaret, 13.
During the long voyage out both William and Adam had fallen in love with the young Anna and she returned William's affections much to the disappointment of Adam who swore that he would marry the first pretty girl he saw after landing.
Transferred, once more, to small boats and rowed ashore, they lived in tents near the beach until wagons, hired from the Dutch farmers in the Zwartkop Valley, arrived and the party was moved from Reed River Post by way of Kowie Pass and Bathurst to it's location between the Kowie and Rufane rivers.
William and Anna were married in May 1821 at Bathurst by the Rev. William Shaw and set up home on land which William acquired adjoining the Thornhill property. They built a house and started farming in 1822 while in that year their first child was born, subsequently followed by 12 more children, all of whom with the exception of one who died in infancy, marred and had families of their own.
William died in 1855 and the inscription on his tombstone in the Cradock cemetery reads:
Sacred to the memory
of
William Frederick Anderson Gilfillan
born 27-1-1796
died 4-9-1855
The deceased came to this country in 1812
an ensign in the 60th Rifles.
Returned to England about 1819 and in 1820
came out as a military settler on half pay.
During the war of 1855 he commanded a
company of Levies and at it's conclusion
was appointed Commandant and Resident
Magistrate of Cradock which office he held
until his death.
and of his widow
Anna Margaret Gilfillan
(born Thornhill)

[NI1662] Twin of Charlotte Gilfillan

[NI1663] Edward Gilfillan was an attorney and at one time Mayor of Cradock. He was the founder of the Cradock Boys' High School.

[NI1673] Lt. John Gilfillan, of Major Grant's Company of Invalides, was in charge of the garrison of Elizabeth Castle, Jersey Island.
Some weeks later, the second son of King George III of England, Prince William Frederick, Duke of York, who was Commander-in-Chief of the British Army, made a tour of inspection of Jersey Island and attended the christening of the new baby on February 20, 1796.
There is a story in the family that the Duke agreed to be a godfather and as a christening present, gave the baby a commission in the Duke of York's Own Rifles which afterward became the 60th Rifles Regiment.
Certainly the boy was to bear the names of William Frederick after the Duke of York and Anderson after another godfather, Major Robert Anderson.

[NI1674] The Bridges family orginated from Solway, Kirkbean, Dumfries, Scotland.

The first Gilfillan to come to South Africa was William Frederick Anderson, second son of Lieutenant John Gilfillan and Elizabeth Bridges.

[NI1676] John and Mary and their children sailed in the "Mandarin" to New Zealand, arriving in Wellington on Christmas Day 1841. Mary Jane Gilfillan remembered there was an earthquake which occurred when the boat was in mid-ocean. The family did not proceed to Wanganui immediately on their arrival in Wellington. By early 1842 they had moved to Wanganui, sailing in a small 10 ton boat "Catherine Johnson". In 1847 Mr Gilfillan's farmhouse at Matarawa was attacked by a party of six Maori youths. Mrs Gilfillan and three children were killed and later another daughter and a grand-daughter died of injuries. Mr Gilfillan wore a throat cover to hide the scar caused by the severe tomahawk wound he received in his neck and his daughter Mary had scars from tomahawk wounds on her forehead. Mr Gilfillan was an artist of considerable talent and his pencil sketches and oil paintings are important records of early New Zealand and Australia.1st cousin of John Alexander Gilfillan.

[NI1677] The first Gilfillan to come to South Africa was William Frederick Anderson, second son of Lieutenant John Gilfillan and Elizabeth Bridges and brother of Adam
Adam had been persuaded to come out by his brother and he was a genuine settler-member of the Thornhill party while William as a half-pay ex military officer, does not appear in the official settlers list.
They spent over three months on the voyage out, in the company of the Thornhill family who were the leaders of the settlers party in the Zoroaster sailing ship in 1820.
During the long voyage out both William and Adam had fallen in love with the young Anna and she returned William's affections much to the disappointment of Adam who swore that he would marry the first pretty girl he saw after landing.
Transferred, once more, to small boats and rowed ashore, they lived in tents near the beach until wagons, hired from the Dutch farmers in the Zwartkop Valley, arrived and the party was moved from Reed River Post by way of Kowie Pass and Bathurst to it's location between the Kowie and Rufane rivers.
In 1823 Adam had married Sophie Marais of Cradock and in 1828 they were sheep farming in the Tarka District and By 1848, Adam was farming in Biesjesfontein, some 4000 morgen on the Stormberg Spruit in the Molteno District. Adam came to South Africa as a Merchant with his brother William, part of the Thornhill Party in 1820 sailing on the "Zoroaster", landing at Simon's Bay, Cape, then sailed to Algoa Bay on the "Albury", landing on 26/6/1820. they farmed beyond the Winterberg and in the Tarka District.
Adam and Sophia had 12 children who married into the van Heerden, Schoeman, Fourie, du Preez, van der Merwe and von Matitz families.
Later that year he was gazetted Justice of the Peace for the Albert District and in 1849 was filling public duties at Burghersdorp.

[NI1678] The first Gilfillan to come to South Africa was William Frederick Anderson, second son of Lieutenant John Gilfillan and Elizabeth Bridges.
Adam had been persuaded to come out by his brother and he was a genuine settler-member of the Thornhill party while William as a half-pay ex military officer, does not appear in the official settlers list.
They spent over three months on the voyage out, in the company of the Thornhill family who were the leaders of the settlers party in the Zoroaster sailing ship in 1820.
The leaders of the party, Christopher Thornhill Thornhill, 47, of Thornhill, Yorkshire, left estates in Cumberland and brought with him his wife, Dorothea Mounsey, 35, their two sons, Christopher, 8, and John, 15, and their two daughters, Mary Francis, 10, and Anna Margaret, 13.
During the long voyage out both William and Adam had fallen in love with the young Anna and she returned William's affections much to the disappointment of Adam who swore that he would marry the first pretty girl he saw after landing.
Transferred, once more, to small beats and rowed ashore, they lived in tents near the beach until wagons, hired from the Dutch farmers in the Zwartkop Valley, arrived and the party was moved from Reed River Post by way of Kowie Pass and Bathurst to it's location between the Kowie and Rufane rivers.
On arrival Christopher Thornhill was given 100 acres of land on the eastern side of the Kowie river near it's mouth in the Albany District.
William and Anna were married in May 1821 at Bathurst by the Rev. William Shaw and set up home on land which William acquired adjoining the Thornhill property. They built a house and started farming in 1822 while in that year their first child was born, subsequently followed by 12 more children, all of whom with the exception of one who died in infancy, marred and had families of their own.
In 1823 Adam had married Sophie Marais of Cradock and they farmed beyond the Winterberg and in the Tarka District.
Adam and Sophia had 12 children who married into the van Heerden, Schoeman, Fourie, du Preez, van der Merwe and von Matitz families.

[NI1679] Gunner in RAF in North Africa. Met Anne in a mental hospital where she was a nurse. They met and married in 3 months.

[NI1680] The originals of these letters are in the possession of Elaine Dodge.
20th May 1993
My Dear Elaine
Many thanks for your welcome letter, in spite of it going astray. I finally received it by a friend of ours who works in the P.O. how is your leg after the dog bite,that is a frightening experience. I am sorry I haven't replyed, but I too had a nasty experience. I was out of action for two months. I fell in the passage going to the toilet in the dark. we now keep the light on. I was feeling my way, and put my hands out thinking the door was closed and it was open with the result I fell on my behind, and injured every bone in my back. I spent a week in hospital and spent the rest of the time lying down and sitting around. only now am I able to walk using a walking stick. I need support for my back. Auntie Cynthia also had an accident Peter rode over her foot. he drove off before she moved away. now she's walking around with her foot bandaged up, luckily no bones were broken.
Auntie Phyllis had a letter from Cindy telling her that your Dad got married on the 15th May how's that going to effect you. have you found somewhere else to live, because living with a step mother does't work. Shannon Smith has moved from Keith and family it didn't work, when shefirst arrived in bulawayo Keith couldn't do enough for her, but as usual all good things come to an end. apart from that I found her a difficult person. she wants all her own way. and this caused trouble with the rest of the family . you mentioned in your letter about forgiveness. I've got nothing against Cindy. doesn't mean I condone her way of life that I am for or against, she can please herself. She knows right from wrong - and who are we to judge. We all have our free agency. All she did was break her mothers heart. how is your business going? I hope succesful. The tension of my machine broke. we were advised to take the machine to a an expert in Secunda he repairs all machines Well he broke the schuttle Peter repaired it, but the tension was still out of order. a friend of ours said he'll take the machine with him when he goes on his rounds. Maybe he'll meet up with somebody who can repair the machine well after two months the machine came back repaired. in the mean time Grandad's cousin in Durban wrote telling me she has a Singer Machine with a electric motor that I can have because she never uses it, it I can dend somebody to fetch it. Well we have friends who are going on holiday to Durban in July and they offered to fetch it. so now I'll have two machines. I promised the one to Auntie Cynthia, the other will be left in my will to a relative who has no machine.
Auntie Jean has her share of troubles. Diane has just recently got divorced and is now living with her mother and Robert is working in a home. he is schizophrenic, earns a small salary but has 4 children, who Auntie Jean has to help support. his complaint came from taking drugs. he is a big handsome man. but the brain is damaged. My heart goes out to Auntie Jean a hard working person. always smiling and ready to help.
I was doing all the cooking, but now that my back is giving trouble I can't stand very long it hurts, so all I am capable of doing is reading and knitting. Praying that I'll soon be back to normal. Auntie Cynthia has been a great help nursing me. Peter's mother died last week, and he and his brother went to Zimbabwe over the weekend to bury her. She was living on her own in Bulawayo. When one gets old and sick you need family. Well my dear heres wishing you the best for the future. hoping to meet you soon. please take note of my address. When Auntie Cynthia and I went to Bulawayo I wanted to visit you, but had no reply to my Magazine I sent you. keep well.
Fondest love Gran.
13 - 9 - 93
My Dear Elaine
Thanks so much for your ever welcome letter, it is six months since I had that fall, and my back is still giving me problems. Standing and walking gives me a lot of pain, for old people to fall is fatal, in November I'll be 86. I dont use a walking stick. I hold on to the arm whoever takes me out. it is mostly Auntie Cynthia, last Sunday we all went to Springs, my neice's grandaughter was blessed this woman isn't married, she wants to go to University next year to study music, her boyfriend is prepared to marry her but she says not until I have completed my studies. these people I am talking about are related to Grandad, it is his youngest brother's grandaughter, he and I have a little joke going on between us, I tell my friends he is my favourite brother in law. And I am his favourite sister in law, we are all we've got, when I got married he was three years old. We are very close. he has had his share of troubles he had 2 children a boy and a girl. he built a house for his retirement with two bedrooms and what happened he ended up with his daughter and her four children coming to live with him, the daughter's first husband drowned fishing in Durban, so she came home with two children, the one child was born lacking a certain chemical he was one of a twin. She then married again, after 12 years they divorced. in between all these problems she stayed with her parents. the eldest daughter got married and divorced also had a child, now she has left home and gone to live with her boy friend. and the second daughter has gone to live with her father, who is also divorced. the reception was held in his house, he is a business man with a lovely home, so Hughie my brother in law only has his daughter and two of her children staying with him. but there is a problem with the grandson he is a schizophrenic. So he can never work he gets a disabilaty pension. And he is a body builder. And has to stay on medication all his life. he is a handsome man well built, will never be any good. All his life will have to be cared for. What a responsibilty for the mother.
Now lets talk about you I am glad to hear you are fixed up with accomadation, you are better off on your own. I am happy with Auntie Phyllis but it is not my home. I am under an obligation being old I need to be cared for. So I can't live on my own. I got the machine, but haven't done any sewing. I dont do any cooking anymore, I am not realluy tp to it. At the moment I have such a bad cold, I never stop sneezing.
I am looking forward to the snaps you promised. Aunty Phyllis got a few from Cindy. She may be going to Zimbabwe in December, when Uncle Peter gets his annaul holidays, they will be staying with Michael in Bulawayo. Sunday Auntie Cynthia and I are going to visit Auntie Jean. And on the 28th Sept a friend of ours is taking me to Pretoria I am going to have a cataract removed from my one eye, the second one will be done at a later date Diane is divorced living with Auntie Jean. the two children are with their father. he has a girl friend who stays with him. he turned out no good. womanizer and boozer. Diane has a boy friend. She's very attractive a blonde and a perfent figure, she'll have no problems finding another husband, only hope he is a good man, Well my dearest write soon, dont forget the snaps, God Bless fondest love. Granny
22nd Nov. 1994
My Dearest Elaine
Many thanks for your welcome letter and also for the birthday wishes. Your letter arrived on my birthday 18th Nov. everybody that is important to me got in touch and that brought me a lot of joy. I had a birthday to remember. I went to a social at the Dart Club, and all the ladies sang happy birthday and presented me with lovely flowers, and we had refreshments. in the evening we had a dinner dance. and the following night we went to the M.O.T.H.S. dinner and dance and Saturday we went to the Hairdresser they sang and we had refreshments, and I was given perfume and they sang Happy Birthday. And friends called round to wish me. And Auntie Jean, Auntie Audrey and Robert are coming to spend Sunday with us. And Saturday, Hugh and Susie are coming on Saturday, Auntie Cynthia and I went to town to do some shopping, Pick & Pay gave me a box of chocolates, and Wimpy gave us a meal on the house. I am sorry to say my hairdresser is leaving Secunda. She has been so kind. I had services free for years. She said I dont have to pay because I am old and special. So old age has its advantages. I've turned 87. I am very glad to hear that if you have a daughter you'll name her Grace. I hope I'll live to see that day. You must make an effort to visit. I've got some things I want to give you. All my cutlery I brought from Bulawayo. Some photos and a picture that you painted for Grandad. my days for entertaing is over. firstly I haven't got a home of my own, my last birthday I invited the family for dinner, but Auntie Phyllis and Cynthia said never again it was too much work so now we take them to the Club for dinner. I perfer a home cooked meal.
You asked how Grandad and I met, well his friend was courting my friend and he asked his friend to arrange a meeting. So thats how we met and from then on we never lost sight of one another. all the nurses at the hospital were struch on him, because he was a handsome guy. So I was fortunate to be the one he chose, dont you think? What kept us together was our love for one another. I hope you meet a man that loves you and I hope I'll live to see that day my ddear.
From the day we met Grandad told me how he loved me and that he wanted to marry me. my parents had no objections. We had lots of ups and downs. but our love brought us through, my parents had 6 children 4 boys and 2 girls. John the eldest. Harry. Anne. George. May. nicknamed Molly and lastly William. called Billy. there is one son living Billy the youngestin Cape Town. he was 7 years old when I got married. And before that I was away from home nursing. so we've got nothing in common with one another, my father was born in Uniondale in the Cape. he came from a family of nine children 3 boys and 6 girls. I've got a book of rememberance. if you want it your may have it. my granfather was a magistrate, and my mother was an orphan, her parents were killed in the Boer War. I've got a photo taken of my grandparents on the Wedding Anniverary it was in the 'Star'newspaper. I was about 15 when that photo was taken. my brother John was Chief Store-keeper on the Crown Mines, that is where my father also worked. my brother John had ne daughter she went to England and took up nursing while she was away her mother died. her name was Norma. She married a doctor, S. Richards. she had two sons, that is all I know about her. My brother harry was a Dental Maechanic, but he ended his days on the Roan Antelope Mine. My Sister never had a family, she was a very attractive person. She was dark with brown eyes.
Well dear so much for the family. bye love God bless, Grannie P.T.O.
Thanks my love for all the compliments.
Gran
8th July 1995
Many thanks for your welcome letter, thats all I've got forwar to look too these days. Its a month ago that I've been incapasited. After spending 2 weeks in bed with bronchitis. I decided to get up and start moving around. that was a dissaster, I fell an injured my back, was hurt, but nothing was broken, but did I suffer. every movement drove me up the wall. I never suffered so much in all my life. Standing and walking is out of the question. When you are old healing takes longer. my days for cooding and sewing is a thing of the past. So life has become very boring, even my hadwriting has changed and my eyesight is'nt the same. I'm thinking of having my eyes tested this will be second time since the operation. the last specs didn't improve things. What a price to pay for getting old. Chereen has written and asked Auntie Cynthia and me to come and visited her, but I am afraid that will have to wait until I am well. Well my dear enough about me, what are you anticipating for the future, any wedding plans. I told Cyndi to get moving if she wants me to attend, time is running out, my days are numbered I didn't realise that until my recent illness. even walking is a problem nothing is more important than having a companion, especially in old age. You need a child, where would I be without my family, they may not need me, but I need them. Auntie Cynthia has nursed me throughout my illness.
Auntie Cynthia and I spent time watching the Rugby, and what excitiment when the Boks won. Now were watching the Tennis. I always wanted to play tennis, but I had to wait until I could afford to buy my own racquet, and that wasn't until I started work. Money was scarce, and my parents had 6 children. 2 girls and 4 boys my brothers played golf. Starting their careers by carring golf clubs. I've got one brother living my youngest William Webb he lives in Cape Town. Grandad Campbell also comes from a large family there was 7 children in his family. those days all the people had lots of children. now adays they have more sense or should I say they have means of preventing. my Grandparents had 9 children.
Enclosed find some snaps the one of you and me Auntie Cunthia gave me. She made your outfit you can see in the snap how old I am. take care of yourself fondest love Grannie XXX
28th July 1996
My Dearest Elaine
Many thanks for your welcome letter, this has been the coldest winter I've ever experienced we had snow for a start, it is seldom that we get snow in SA in fact it is the third time in my life time. Grandad was cycling to work when he came across all these little brids lying on the side of the road frozen from the snow, so he picked them up and put them under his jerset brought them home, kept them in a safe until they were fit to fly he let them go. this safe I am talking aboiut was made with gauze wire, we kept meat in there. that was before the fridge was heard of.
I am keeping well except for the fact that I cant walk to well, I can't straighten my back.
On Sunday Peter took us to Springs to visit Audrey and Robert Potts, Uncle Melville's sister and brother in law. She always makes us very welcome. for dinner we had roast lamb. potatoes peas, squash and rice, and Xmas pudding. it was such a cold day we sat around the heater all day. Auntie Cynthia doesn't travel in her car anymore. it is not safe for woman to travel alone, there is too much violence going on. When Audrey and Robert come to visit us they bring Auntie Jean. Diane got married to a chap six years younger than herself, his brother in Clair's boyfriend. Clair's brother Clyde is also married. you must miss Craig. he may never come back.
I've got a book I'd like to give you. It is entitled, "Intimate moments with God." it was given to me when I was ill, even the doctor thought my days were numbered but I surprised them all. Sunday after visiting Audrey on our way home we called on to Hugh Campbell, Grandad's youngest brother, he built a house for his retirement but it ended up with his divorced daughter with her four children moved in. one grandaughter is studing Music and duama at varsity in Cape Town, when she has finished hed course there, she's going to Bringham Young University in America.
You know Elaine, only Grandad can bring happiness in to my life, without him I am lost. all mu life I depended on him. now that I am old and feeble I need him.
Cyndi had an operation but she's home again and feeling better. She writes regularly. So does Shelley Smith. There is a rumor that the firm where Uncle Peter works is closing down in September then we will be on the street. I should of stayed in bulawayo. I was about to move into Coronation Flats when I was invited to come and stay with Auntie Phyllis. I cant afford to move into an Old Age Home, the price is R600 per month and my income is only R300 I am depending on my Heavenly Father to care for me.
I've got a nephew by the name of Donald Webb. he took up nursing and after doing a course in Durban he got married and went to Canada. then carried on with his studies and passed all his exams, he held the position of Matron the last I heard of him, he had a daughter and got divorced his wife came from England. his father my brother died in Zambia, and then I lost contact with the family, his mother got married again and moved to Cape Town, there was 2 girls and 2 boys the only girl Beverly was an artist. she made a mural for the High School in Zambia, and the youngest brother Walter he was an engineer.
My oldest brother John had one daughter she went to England took up nursing and married a doctor. both her parents died in their early sixties. and my father died at the age of 54. he came from a family of 9 children. 3 boys and six girls. his father was a magistrate. they lived in the Cape. In East London there is a street named after him and in Johannesburg there is a street named after his brother "Webb St."
Xmas time you must come to Auntie Jean for a holiday Auntie Cynthia and I will be there for 2 weeks, that is the only wasy we will be able to meet , all going well.
I can only walk short distances, Grandad bought a wheel chair before he got ill, he must have had a premonition that I would need it. but the problem is that nobody can handle it.
Well my dear write soon and God Bless. fondest love, you know I love. you are very dear to me.
love Grannie
18th March 1996
My Dear Elaine
Many thanks for your card. I am on the mend I was very ill spent months in bed I took ill in October and it wasnt until December before I left my bed, the Doctor didn't know what was wrong, he put it down to old age. I wasn't very happy with his diagnosis, he told Auntie Cynthia I must stay in bed, if I get up I'll fall and brake my hip. Imagine if I followed his instructions I would still be in bed. I had already spent about 4 months in bed, only now I am beginning to walk on my own.
How are you keeping now? I was sorry to hear of your illness but there was nothing I could do, not even write as you can see my writing is a shambles, to be quite honest I thought my days were numbered. It is no joy to get old, Auntie Cynthia nursed me through my illness, my neighbour lent me a komode. wich I am still using.
Elaine you must be careful if you fall and hurt your back, that injury remains with you for life. Auntie Jean and your Mom had that experience. I also fell twice and injured my back.
I miss Grandad especially when I am ill. his prayers helped me I dont move out of the house I never go shopping there is nothing I can buy. toiletries Auntie Cynthia buys but can you imagine what it is like never to move out of the house. I shouldn't complain, because I could be worse off in an old age home. To day is Auntie Phyllis's birthday she is 65. I've got a TV in my room. Keith has been very ill he had an operation for bladder problem and prostrate gland. he has been in hospital for 2 weeks lost a lot of blood, I spend my time reading, sewing and knitting is out. Auntie Cynthia & I used to do a lot of travelling but that too had to be cut, petrol has gone up and also it is not safe travelling on our own. Uncle Peter works on weekends so he can't accompany us. I've got a couple of albums I want to give you but how do I get them there is another story. Auntie Phyllis maybe coming to visit Cynthia at the end of the year then perhaps she can take them to you, my days for travelling is over.
Auntie Jean says whenever you want to visit her you are welcome, but she works so the best time will be during the Xmas holidays. Bevy's husband Barry spent a month in Germany, the firm he works for sends him all over the has been to Italy as well. The money is good but not the seperation from home. how is your busines? Cindy sent me a poem she wrote, do you ever see her. Auntie Cynthia & I are going to spend 2 weeks with Auntie Jean during the Xmas holidays, so that will be an ideal time for you to come as well, Auntie Cynthia usually goes with Auntie Phyllis to Zimbabwe but this year she's not going. Auntie Jean will always accomate us. Auntie Jean turns out some real professional dresses. And how about you are you still sewing for yourself? Now adays skirts and jackets are all the go I made myself a white jacket and that I can wear with any colour dress or skirt, and I made several for Phyllis and Cynthia all colours, but of course now I can't sew any more, knitting is also a thing of the past. Phyllis spends a lot of time with the knitting machine.
Well my dear sitll no news of a marriage. I only hope and pray that the man of your choice will be worthy of you, maybe you dont need a husband now but you definetly need him when you get old, it is a lonely life. you also need a child, where would I be without my daughters. Jean and Bevy are very close. You know Elaine its 9 years since I last saw you so you'll see a big change in me. my gair is falling out and I am all bent and wrinkled. I am talking about Xmas who knows I maybe gone. my dear remember I love you. when we lived in Zambia I saw a lot of you and Craig. now all my grandchildren are grown up. the only ones I hear from is you and Cindy.
Write soon fondest love GrannieXX

[NI1682] The original of these letters are in the possession on Elaine Dodge:
Po Box 4040
SecuNdA 2302
South Africa 20-5-96
My deARest Elaine
Hullo mu Love. I was just looKing thRough my address book and I found your thank you note in the book. You wrote it to me on the 27th November, I see you asked for Aunty Jean' address and I cAnnot Remember

[NI1817] Worked on Crown mines.

[NI1818] Was an orphan

[NI1819] Was chief storekeeper on the Crown mines.

[NI1821] Was a dental mechanic, but finished his days on the Roan Antelope mine.

[NI1824] She was a very attractive person. She was dark with brown eyes.

[NI1829] Was a magistrate.
Had 9 children 3 boys and 6 girls.

[NI1830] Had 9 children - 3 boys and 6 girls

[NI1851] Whilst a prefect at High School, Lylie and 3 colleagues made a pact to meet each other after a time span of 25 years, on the steps of the Museum in Salisbury (Harare). She entered this, with the agreed date, into her Book of Birthdays. Having virtually forgotten all about this, she noticed the date was approaching but thought that none of the others would be there, let alone remember the pact. However, she decided to go on the off chance. So, at the appointed time, she went to the Museum steps and there were 2 of the 3. One of the 2 on the steps had come all the way from the USA, just to be there!! A message appeared in the local newspaper from the third explaining that she would be unable to make the "reunion".

[NI1855] For information on their honeymoon see Appendix 7, Bush Horizons by N. V. Phillips (Conlon Printers, Harare 1999)

[NI1856] For information on their honeymoon see Appendix 7, Bush Horizons by N. V. Phillips (Conlon Printers, Harare 1999)

[NI1886] Some dates of Abraham's children's births are slightly different from David Hyde Thorne's notes

[NI1889] Eleanor was a governess.

[NI1891] Percy was a stock contractor. He was killed in France in 1918, a member of the Rhodesian Veterinary Corps.

[NI1892] Francis was an attorney.

[NI1894] After the death of their spouses, Stanley and Lillian decided to move in together and lived at Weybridge, Surrey near her daughter Kathleen. I visited them occasionally as my parents had moved to nearby Cobham in 1948.

[NI1895] Stanley was a commercial traveller dealing in cloths and silks.
An active mason, Stanley became the Master of Hyde Park Lodge, hence the name Hyde in son and grandson, although neither became masons.
After the death of their spouses, Stanley and Lillian decided to move in together and lived at Weybridge, Surrey near her daughter Kathleen. I visited them occasionally as my parents had moved to nearby Cobham in 1948.

[NI1897] Graham was a ship broker. He spent two years in Paris working as a charter clerk for Louis Dreyfus & Fils. He became fluent in French and spoke passable German. He returned to London, entered H. D. Blythe & Co. as a clerk, became a member of the Baltic Shipping Exchange. he retired in 1972 as the senior partner.
His partnership became the sole London and UK agents for the Mitsui/Mitsubishi Japanese industrial/shipping complex.
He volunteered as an RAF Bomber Air Gunner. He was rejected on medical grounds. He served as an Air Raid Warden and simultaneously joined the Home Guard. Commissioed to Captain, became and active demolition and hand grenade instructor. Throughout the war he administered the Dutch Merchant Marine for the British Government.
He was a keen tennis player, loved long walks, was an avid gardener, collected stamps, and was a Bisley Marksman (highest class of sharpshooter in the Commonwealth). his principle passion throughout his life was ships and shipping.

[NI1898] Florence had red hair and suffered from Migranes.
Florence spent some time during the Blitz working in a mobile canteen for a Heavy Rescue Squad. Otherwise she ran a Savings Group (war bonds).
Florence was Kathleen's cousin.

[NI1899] Kathleen served in the WAAF during WWII. Commissioned and commanded a barrage balloon detachment in Liverpool. Lost one balloon during high winds, which she chased in a truck until the cable wrapped itself around the only swing bridge on the Manchester Ship Canal, making the bridge inoperable and closing the canal to shipping for two days.
She was committed to war veterans and spent much time and effort supporting them through the "lest we
forget" society.
A consumate gourmet cook she excelled at golf and was captain of the Epsom Golf Club. Her golf skills delighted the Japanese to whom she was presented for their approval without her knowledge in 1969.
She enjoyed the role of family matriach, carried out with much gusto and enthusiasm.

[NI1902] Susan was a teacher and later Vice Principle.
She arrived in Montreal, Canada on board the Empress of France C. P. in August 1957.

[NI1905] Bryan was a teacher.

[NI1909] Sally was a nurse in Cardiac Research.
She arrived in Montreal, Canada on board the Empress of France C. P. in August 1957.

[NI1933] Robin and julia are missionaries in Rumania.

[NI1958] Page 2 - Barkly East Reporter 10 July 1998
Diamond Wedding Anniversary
A couple much loved and respected in Barkly East have celebrated their diamond wedding in Johannesburg where they were married 60 year ago. Noel and Mary (Molly) Robertson spent 30 years in Barkly East where Mrs Robertson was awarded the Freedom of the Town in 1988 for her services to the community.
Aunt Molly as she was known was the first local citizen to receive this honour and the first woman to be elected the town's deputy mayor for two years.
The Robertsons were married in St Mary's Cathedral, Johannesburg, in 1938 by the bride's uncle, the Rev Frank Sutton, who had retired the previous year after 25 years as headmaster of Dale College, King Williams Town.
Noel represented Border at rugby and toured Argentina with the Junior Springboks in 1932. During the Second World War he was captured at Tobruk in North Africa and spent three years in prisoner-of-war camps in Italy and Germany.
After the war Noel, an accountant and Molly lived in several Eastern Cape towns and in Rhodesia before settling in Barkly East.
There Mrs Robertson devoted much of her life to church, welfare and community work. The Anglican church awarded her the Order of Simon of Cyrene for her humanitarian services to the church and the community.
A former nursing sister, she served the Red Cross for 22 years and she was chairlady for seven. She was the first woman town councillor in the Barkly East history and held this post for eight years. She was active in many charitable organisations.
The Robertsons, now in their late 80's moved two years ago to a retirement village in Kensington, Johannesburg home of their younger son, David and his wife Russella. Elder son Hugh, who lives in Canada, flew over for the occasion.
A video converted from a cine film of the 1938 wedding reception was shown at the celebration lunch.
A special guest was netta Sephton, a Barkly East friend of Molly's for 30 years, who now lives in Bryanston, Sandton.
Also present were Mrs Robertson's younger sister, mrs Audrey May of Roodepoort, who with the two Robertson sons, was present at the Freedom of Barkly East ceremony the years ago. Other members of the Robertsons' close and extended family joined in the celebration.
Barkly East has a special place in the Robersons' hearts. They miss their friends there a great deal.
As Aunt Molly remarked when she received the Freedom of the Town: ' Bing Cosby said it all. I love those dear hearts and gentle people who in my home town.'
A TRIBUTE TO NOEL HUGH ROBERTSON 1910-1999
Father Hulley, Friends and Family.
On behalf of my Mom, Russella, Hugh and Joann, I would like to thank you for coming along to pay your last respects to my Dad.
My first recollection of my Dad was at 4 o'clock on a cold winter's morning in KingWilliamsTown. Mom and Hugh had gone to me Blaney, a railway junction between KingWilliamsTown and East London, to meet and welcome my Dad after an absence of 4 years whilst serving in the 2nd World War, most of which was spent in a German prison of war camp after he was captured at Tobruk. On his arrival at home he was wearing an army overcoat which made him look bigger than ever and I had to compete with Leo the family Ridgeback who instantly recognised him and for a moment in time Leo didn't care too much about my safety!
My Dad always had a great respect for the wellbeing of his health. In his younger days he put great emphasis on exercise, fitness and eating correctly and this undoubtedly contributed to his sporting excellence. When I was a little boy, he used to wake me up early in the morning and take out a box of apples from under the spare bed in my bedroom and sit on my bed and meticulously peel us each an apple. I know that an apple a day keeps the doctor away but as a 4 to 5 year old, I didn't expect to start each day in the fashion! Ever since then apples have been my favourite and especially Granny Smiths!
My Dad loved the Eastern Cape and except for a year in the 1930's and 3 years in Zimbabwe during the 1960's, he spent all his life in the part of the country he loved most, especially the mountainous regions of the North Eastern Cape. This in turn provided our family with the opportunity of growing up in the farming communities which from my point of view, was idyllic. The year the he was away from the Eastern Cape in the 1930's was spent in Johannesburg where he played for Transvaal rugby side. At the same time he formed a lifelong friendship with the Betty family and I thank Aunt Bobs for being with us today.
My Dad was the longest surviving member of the first Junior Springbok rugby side chosen in 1932 which toured the Argentine. He was a member of the Border rugby side which successively shared the Currie Cup in 1932 and 1934 with Western Province and who had the likes of Danie Craven and Bennie Osler playing for them. He became the captain of Border thereafter and was nicknamed "Gunboat" Robertson for his devastating tackling!
My Dad loved the simple things of a country life. He worked hard and served his profession honourably. He enjoyed travelling around the Border and Transkei. He loved and religously fed his garden birds every day in Barkly East but didn't tolerate their enemies, notably Butcher birds and cats. He always had a pile of stones on the kitchen windowsill ready for the impending battle. I think this arsenal was occassionally used on the Kweddings, when my Mom wasn't watching, when they used to come and take his apples off the trees.
My Dad was always supportive of the community and welfare work that my Mom did in Barkly East and always accompanied her to the weekly service in the local Anglican church.
My Dad was first and foremost a gsntleman, extremely well mannered and courteous. He was a very moral person who set a fine example to Hugh, Rosalie and myself. He loved my Mom and the success of their marriage was celebrated last year with their Diamond Wedding Anniversary. If it were not for his declining memory loss over the last few years, he would have loved to have thanked my Mom for her understanding of his condition, her patience, tolerance, love and devotion which she gave to him until her own health began to decline at the beginning of the year. I know that her thoughts and prayers are with us at this very moment.
I thank God for the life of my Dad, who not only served his country, but who was loved by all of us in so many different ways. Go well Pops, our love for you will be eternal.
David Robertson
29th July 1999

[NI1959] Page 2 - Barkly East Reporter 10 July 1998
Diamond Wedding Anniversary
A couple much loved and respected in Barkly East have celebrated their diamond wedding in Johannesburg where they were married 60 year ago. Noel and Mary (Molly) Robertson spent 30 years in Barkly East where Mrs Robertson was awarded the Freedom of the Town in 1988 for her services to the community.
Aunt Molly as she was known was the first local citizen to receive this honour and the first woman to be elected the town's deputy mayor for two years.
The Robertsons were married in St Mary's Cathedral, Johannesburg, in 1938 by the bride's uncle, the Rev Frank Sutton, who had retired the previous year after 25 years as headmaster of Dale College, King Williams Town.
Noel represented Border at rugby and toured Argentina with the Junior Springboks in 1932. During the Second World War he was captured at Tobruk in North Africa and spent three years in prisoner-of-war camps in Italy and Germany.
After the war Noel, an accountant and Molly lived in several Eastern Cape towns and in Rhodesia before settling in Barkly East.
There Mrs Robertson devoted much of her life to church, welfare and community work. The Anglican church awarded her the Order of Simon of Cyrene for her humanitarian services to the church and the community.
A former nursing sister, she served the Red Cross for 22 years and she was chairlady for seven. She was the first woman town councillor in the Barkly East history and held this post for eight years. She was active in many charitable organisations.
The Robertsons, now in their late 80's moved two years ago to a retirement village in Kensington, Johannesburg home of their younger son, David and his wife Russella. Elder son Hugh, who lives in Canada, flew over for the occasion.
A video converted from a cine film of the 1938 wedding reception was shown at the celebration lunch.
A special guest was netta Sephton, a Barkly East friend of Molly's for 30 years, who now lives in Bryanston, Sandton.
Also present were Mrs Robertson's younger sister, mrs Audrey May of Roodepoort, who with the two Robertson sons, was present at the Freedom of Barkly East ceremony the years ago. Other members of the Robertsons' close and extended family joined in the celebration.
Barkly East has a special place in the Robersons' hearts. They miss their friends there a great deal.
As Aunt Molly remarked when she received the Freedom of the Town: ' Bing Cosby said it all. I love those dear hearts and gentle people who in my home town.'

[NI1973] Youngest daughter of the Rev. C. D. and Mrs Helm of Hope Fountain Mission, where she was born. Lived most of her life in Bulawayo and died there in 1934. She was buried at Hope Fountain. On roll of Women Pioneers. -- Taken from 'Rhodesia's Pioneer Women (1859 - 1896)' by Jessie M. Lloyd

[NI2013] Book: Hepburn (Rev. J. D.) Twenty Years In Khama's Country. London: Hodder & Stoughton 1895
Extract from 'Pioneers of Rhodesia'
HEPBURN, the Rev. JAMES DAVIDSON (1840-1893).
Missionary. He was born in England and married Elizabeth Reid in 1870, the year he was appointed by the L. M. S. to serve with Mackenzie at Shoshong. The Hepburns and the Mackenzies reached their station during August 1871. After Mackenzie removed to Kuruman in June 1876, Hepburn worked alone at Shoshong till the arrival of Rev. Edwin Lloyd in 1885.
The Hepburns went into southern Matabeleland during January or February 1873. their purpose was to buy grain, which was then scarce among the Mangwato from the Kalanga for the mission and its students and their families. They travelled the Hunters' Road nearly to Tati, crossed the Shashi at the Ramaquabane junction, trekked northeastwards to the Santchokwe about 20 miles above its mouth, and then crossed the Semokwe to a place 25 miles east of that river. They returned by the same route and were home again by February or March.
The Hepburns and the Mackenzies left Shoshong at the end of February 1874 to attend the annual committee meeting at Kuruman, and they were still absent in April. Hepburn was at Shoshong in June 1875, and he and his family journeyed to Kuruman again next year. See Helm.
Hepburn, his wife, their three children and two Bechuana evangelists, with three wagons, left Shoshong on 26 April 1877 and arrived at Lake Ngami on 2 June. They stayed at Moremi's Town on the Lake River for Hepburn was attempting to answer that chief's request made two years earlier, for an L. M. S. missionary. The Hepburns visited Khanzi where the Boer hunters Bauer and Van Zyl were living, and they returned to Shoshong by 13 September. A European missionary was not available so in 1878 Hepburn sent two Bechuana evangelists to live among the Tswana.
Sykes and Hepburn were instrumental in Khama's refusal in July 1879 to permit the Jesuits to found a station at Shoshong.
Hepburn went to Nagami again from March to September 1881 and again for a brief visit of ten days at the end of that year; he returned to Shoshong early in January 1882. He went principally to investigate the progress of the outstation there and to encourage the teachers. The Hepburns spent eighteen months away, mid-1883 to the end of 1884, on furlough in England, and he visited Lake Ngami for the last time during the winter of 1886.
The missionaries moved to Palapye with Khama and his tribe during August and September 1889. Hepburn accompanied Khama to the meeting at the Limpopo with Shippard and Joubert about the death of Grobler, and there Hepburn contracted malaria from which he never fully recovered. He and his wife were both ill during 1890, and she left in September 1891 with their children for the Cape to rest and obtain medical aid. Because of a quarrel with Khama and his need for recuperation, Hepburn left Palapye for England in October 1891. He died at Newcastle on 31 December 1893. (PcJ. Hp20. O. StD. Mz. Ho7. Ju-1. MJs.).

[NI2034] The first Gilfillan to come to South Africa was William Frederick Anderson, second son of Lieutenant John Gilfillan and Elizabeth Bridges and brother of Adam who came out with William.
They spent over three months on the voyage out, in the company of the Thornhill family who were the leaders of the settlers party in the Zoroaster sailing ship in 1820.
The leaders of the party, Christopher Thornhill Thornhill, 47, of Thornhill, Yorkshire, left estates in Cumberland and brought with him his wife, Dorothea Mounsey, 35, their two sons, Christopher, 8, and John, 15, and their two daughters, Mary Francis, 10, and Anna Margaret, 13.
During the long voyage out both William and Adam had fallen in love with the young Anna and she returned William's affections much to the disappointment of Adam who swore that he would marry the first pretty girl he saw after landing.
Transferred, once more, to small beats and rowed ashore, they lived in tents near the beach until wagons, hired from the Dutch farmers in the Zwartkop Valley, arrived and the party was moved from Reed River Post by way of Kowie Pass and Bathurst to it's location between the Kowie and Rufane rivers.
On arrival Christopher Thornhill was given 100 acres of land on the eastern side of the Kowie river near it's mouth in the Albany District.

[NI2035] The first Gilfillan to come to South Africa was William Frederick Anderson, second son of Lieutenant John Gilfillan and Elizabeth Bridges and brother of Adam who came to South Africa with him.
They spent over three months on the voyage out, in the company of the Thornhill family who were the leaders of the settlers party in the Zoroaster sailing ship in 1820.
The leaders of the party, Christopher Thornhill Thornhill, 47, of Thornhill, Yorkshire, left estates in Cumberland and brought with him his wife, Dorothea Mounsey, 35, their two sons, Christopher, 8, and John, 15, and their two daughters, Mary Francis, 10, and Anna Margaret, 13.

[NI2036] The first Gilfillan to come to South Africa was William Frederick Anderson, second son of Lieutenant John Gilfillan and Elizabeth Bridges and brother of Adam who came with him.
They spent over three months on the voyage out, in the company of the Thornhill family who were the leaders of the settlers party in the Zoroaster sailing ship in 1820.
The leaders of the party, Christopher Thornhill Thornhill, 47, of Thornhill, Yorkshire, left estates in Cumberland and brought with him his wife, Dorothea Mounsey, 35, their two sons, Christopher, 8, and John, 15, and their two daughters, Mary Francis, 10, and Anna Margaret, 13.

[NI2037] The first Gilfillan to come to South Africa was William Frederick Anderson, second son of Lieutenant John Gilfillan and Elizabeth Bridges and brother of Adam who came with him.
They spent over three months on the voyage out, in the company of the Thornhill family who were the leaders of the settlers party in the Zoroaster sailing ship in 1820.
The leaders of the party, Christopher Thornhill Thornhill, 47, of Thornhill, Yorkshire, left estates in Cumberland and brought with him his wife, Dorothea Mounsey, 35, their two sons, Christopher, 8, and John, 15, and their two daughters, Mary Francis, 10, and Anna Margaret, 13.

[NI2038] The first Gilfillan to come to South Africa was William Frederick Anderson, second son of Lieutenant John Gilfillan and Elizabeth Bridges and brother of Adam who came with him.
They spent over three months on the voyage out, in the company of the Thornhill family who were the leaders of the settlers party in the Zoroaster sailing ship in 1820.
The leaders of the party, Christopher Thornhill Thornhill, 47, of Thornhill, Yorkshire, left estates in Cumberland and brought with him his wife, Dorothea Mounsey, 35, their two sons, Christopher, 8, and John, 15, and their two daughters, Mary Francis, 10, and Anna Margaret, 13.

[NI2039] Killed in the Boer War

[NI2040] Killed in the Boer War.

[NI2074] Founder of Hope Fountain Mission. -- From Alexis Hepburn and 'Rhodesia's Pioneer Women (1859-1896) by Jessie M. Lloyd
Extract from 'Pioneers of Rhodesia'
HELM, the Rev. CHARLES DANIEL (1844 - 1915).
Missionary. He was the grandson of two L. M. S. men and the son of another, Daniel Helm. Helm was born in Cape Colony and was educated at Swellendam and Cape Town and in London from 1868 to 1873. He joined the L. M. S. and volunteered for Matabeleland, and in 1873 he married in London Elizabet von Puttkamer of Pomerania, a companion and governess. They arrived at Cape Town the same year.
The Helms left Zuurbraak, Cape Colony, in October 1874 with their four-months-old daughter Jessie and two wagons. At Kuruman, which they reached at the end of January 1875, they stayed three mnths to recruit the oxen and to replace their servants with Bechuanas. They arrived at Shoshong about 24 June and stopped another three months, till Mrs. Helm gave birth to a son at the end of August. Mackenzie was away on leave, and the traders, including Dawson and Musson, tended the new missionaries during a bout of fever. The Helms resumed their journey on 8 November and reached Hope Fountain on 2 December.
Helm took over Thomson's pole-and-daga house for the latter had just moved into a new brick residence. Mrs. Helm fell ill within two months of their arrival, so they packed up and went to Shoshong. Helm, Mackenzie, Hepburn, Thomson and Holub left Shoshong for the south on 7 June 1876. Mackenzie was moving to Kuruman, Helm went for his family's health, and all the missionaries attended at Kuruman the annual meeting. They met Lieut. Grandy at the mouth of the Notwani, and Holub parted with them at a Bechuana village farther south. The Helms were two months at Kuruman, after which they returned to Hope Fountain.
Helm took over the brick house when Thomson left for England and Central Africa in 1876. Selous stayed with them during June and July 1878 to recuperate after his journey over the Zambezi. By 1880 Helm was postmaster for Bulawayo, and regular fortnightly mails came from Shoshong via Tati. The Helms went to Kuruman in altenate years for annual meetings, and from 1886 to 1888 they were on furlough, probably to England.
Helm was back at his station by May 1888, and in September and October he acted as interpreter for Rudd, Maguire and Thopson in their dealings with Loben. Helm witnessed the Rudd-Rhodes Concession on 31 October. He retired to Palpye during the Matabele War of 1893; he left Hope Fountain about 25 July, was at Palapye my mid-August, and returned to Matabeleland in early January 1894. Mrs. Helm died at Hope Fountain in November 1913, and her husband retired the next year and died in Bulawayo Hospital during January 1915. (Lm. LoLMS. EIG. StD. Ho7. SHw. R-2. PcJ. PP-2. PP-3. BiFs. SA-5.)

[NI2075] Nee Elizabeth Eduardine, daughter of Baron von Putt Kamer. Wife of the well known missionary of Hope Fountain the Rev. Charles D. Helm. Before coming to South Africa she lived in her father's castle in Germany. She left home and was a governess for a time to Lord Plunket's family in Ireland. Mrs Helm entertained Cecil Rhodes and many other distinguished people and was renowned for her kindness. She died in 1913 and was buried at Hope Fountain, near Bulawayo. Pages 86-91 'First Steps In Civilizing Rhodesia', by Jeannie M. Boggie. On roll of Women Pioneers. --- Taken from 'Rhodesia's Pioneer Women (1859-1896)' Compiled by Jessie M. Lloyd

[NI2076] Arrived with her parents Rev and Mrs C. D. Helm, at Hope Fountain Mission, when she was 19 months old. Her valuable memoirs entitled 'Thy Beginning', were arranged for publication in 1956 by the Rhodesia Pioneers and Early Settlers Society, and an interesting article by her appears on pp. 86-91of 'First Steps in Civilizing Rhodesia' (Mrs Boggie). Mrs Lovemore was affectionately known as the 'Grand Old Lady of Rhodesia'. She died in Bulawayo on 6th September 1960. She had lived longer in Rhodesia than any other white person and was given a state funeral at Hope Fountain Mission. On Roll of Women Pioneers. -- from 'Rhodesia's Pioneer Women (1859-96)' by Jessie M. Lloyd.

[NI2156] Balfour was a Mining Commissioner.
Balfour and Winnifred divorced.
Balfour lived at Farswood Farm in Mutare (then Umtali).

[NI2157] Winnifred and Balfour divorced.

[NI2159] Annie was born at Hope Fountain and buried there in 1952. She was the second daughter of the Rev. C. D. Helm an Mrs Helm. She taught at Plumtree when the school was first started there. On roll of Women Pioneers --- Taken from 'Rhodesia's Pioneer Women' (1859-1896) compiled by Jessie M. Lloyd.
Annie was a teacher by profession. She never married.
THIS IS THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF ME
ANNIE KATE WINNEFRIED HELM
Spinster, present of Salisbury.
I HEREBY REVOKE, cancel and annul all wills, codicils and other testamentary dispositions heretofore made by me, desiring that they shall be nuyll and void and of no effect.
1. I BEQUEATH the whole of my Estate in equal share, share and share alike , unto my brother CECIL VON PUTTKAMER HELM, and the following of my nephews and nieces:- ALEXIS MOODIE LOVEMORE, CONSTANCE MARY DRIVER, BALFOUR HELM LOVEMORE, ERICA ROSE COLLINS, ERIC TOM HEPBURN, ALEXIS PATRICIA THORNE, CECILLE ERICA HEPBURN, ELISABETH LORRAINE HEPBURN, and CHARLES PATRICK HEPBURN.
2. I APPOINTmy nephew HECTOR VON PUTTKAMER LOVEMORE to be the Executor and Trustee of my Estate, hereby giving and granting unto him all such power and authority as are required or allowed in law, especially that of assumption. I give unto my said Executor and Trustee the right ot utilise any funds from myu Estate thet may devolve upon any minor child or children, subject to his satisfying the Master of the High Court as to the manner in which such funds are to be expended.
3. I RESERVE to myself the right at any time to make all such alterations in or additions to this my will as I may think fit, either by a seperate act or at the foot thereof, desiring that all such alterations or additions so made under my own signature shall be as valid and effectual as if inserted herein.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand at Salisbury this 17th day of August 1945, in the persenceof the undersigned witnesses.
AS WITNESSES:
1. Eveline M. Collins
W. Helm
2. Doreen P. Lewis

[NI2160] Alexis never married.

[NI2164] Daniel Helm was with the London Missionary Society.

[NI2166] Heinrich Helm was with the London Missionary Society. He arrived in South Africa in 1811 and joined William and Johanna Anderson in Griquatown.

[NI2169] For Information regarding William Anderson read 'Weapons of Peace'

[NI2183] Hedwig Louisa was the daughter of the Rev. C. D. and Mrs Helm and twin sister of Erica Elise (Mrs Hepburn). She only lived three weeks. She was born at Hope Fountain. Information p. 89 First Steps In Civilizing Rhodesia (Mrs Boggie) ---- Taken from 'Rhodesia's Pioneer Women (1859 - 1896)' by Jessie M. Lloyd

[NI2184] Nora Delphina was the third child born to the Rev. C. D. and Mrs Helm. She lived only three weeks and was buried in the newly made cemetry at Hope Fountain, which already contained the graves of Willie Thomson and Mrs Gary Palmer. Information p. 88 'First Steps In Civilizing Rhodesia' (Mrs Boggie). -- Taken from 'Rhodesia's Pioneer Women (1859-1896)' by Jessie M. Lloyd

[NI2185] Lived in Roodepoort (Barkly East Reporter)

[NI2186] Lived in Roodepoort (Barkly East Reporter)

[NI2187] Went to England and took up nursing.

[NI2192] A prominent descendant of the Huguenot emigrnct of that name who came to the Cape in the early days of its history.

[NI2202] Was a schizophrenic, his complaint came from taking drugs.

[NI2247] Served in RAF - Killed in war

[NI2256] Known as Rhodesias vegetable King

[NI2290] Was a bachelor. He settled in Zimbabwe

[NI2291] Was a batchelor. Surveyor General of Zimbabwe.
Charles was known as "Tamoshanter" Gilfillan. His cure was to sit in a stream up to his neck in water with a tamoshanter on his head and smoking a pipe.

[NI2292] Owned Palgrave Farm at Umvuma, Rhodesia (Mvuma, Zimbabwe)

[NI2293] Anne Pretorius was always very proud of the fact to be born on Pioneer Day - the day the British Flag was first hoisted in Salisbury (Harare). Ann Pretorius is the widow of George's cousin William Henry Gilfillan.
George and Ann had no children

[NI2296] Living in the USA

[NI2297] Killed in flying accident while training with the Rhodesian (Zimbabwean) Air Force

[NI2338] Helen never married.

[NI2362] When he died he was reported to be a Transport Conductor. He died intestate.

[NI2368] Robert Bradshaw Clarke Urry was the bank manager in Mafeking in the Boer War who issued siege notes with Baden Powell (founder of Scouting).
My grandfather was let out of Mafeking as a toddler with his mother and could remember being checked out by boer solidiers sticking bayonets under their seats incase any British solidiers were hiding there...

[NI2374] Seymour is Selwyn's twin

[NI2375] Selwyn is Seymour's twin.

[NI2395] Died giving birth.

[NI2410] Charles was awarded the CMG (Companion of The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael & St. George), by the King of England. Founder of the Culmstock Horse Stud. Was M.L.C. for Eastern Divisions1858-1859. CMG. South African Senator . Order of St Michael & St George for services during the Boer War,1899-1902.

[NI2412] For many years, Surveyor General of thr Transvaal.

[NI2437] Worked for SABC-TV (South African Broadcasting Corporation - Television)

[NI2448] Never married

[NI2538] Entered the Imperial army in 1864 , served with the Lincolnshire Regiment until 1878. Then joined Cape Colonial Forces. As Colonel had the orders of Companion of the Bath and St Michael & St George conferred on him. He was the Officer Commanding, Cape Volunteers, 1882 -1892

South Africa Magazine, January 1, 1910, titled Domestic Announcements: SOUTHEY - On December
1, at Claremont, Cape Town, Colonel Richard George Southey, C.B., C.M.G., late Lincolnshire Regiment, fourth son of the late Sir Richard Southey, K.C.M.G.

[NI2660] The investiture of Col. C. D. Griffith by His Excellency the Governor Sir H. Bartie Frere, Bart, G.C.B., G.C.S.I., etc. with the insignia as a Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George took place in King Williams Town on January 19, 1878 in token of appreciation by Queen Victoria's Government for long and meritorious service.

[NI2675] Never married

[NI2693] Had no children

[NI2694] Had no children

[NI2696] Killed at Bardia

[NI2808] Never married

[NI2811] Olive and Fred Rainer had no children

[NI2817] Fred and Olive had no children

[NI2818] MacGregor and Lillian had no children

[NI2819] MacGregor and Lillian had no children

[NI2836] Georges wife Ann Pretorius was the widow of his cousin William Henry Gilfillan. George and Ann had no children.

[NI2837] Harry never married.

[NI2855] Douglas and Moyra adopted Glen in 1956.

[NI2856] Douglas and Moyra adopted Glen in 1956.

[NI2905] Died of Blackwater Fever in Rhodesia (Zimbabwe).

[NI2911] Brian and Petrina became well known in theatrical circles overseas and in South Africa. They started the Brian Brooke Cmopany at the Hofmeyer Hall in Cape Town in 1946 and founded and built their very own Brooke Theatre in Johannesburg in 1955.

[NI2915] Clive and Alan are twins.

[NI2916] Alan and Clive are twins.

[NI2923] Mildred was Jack's first cousin and daughter of William Thornhill and Cornelia Smuts. Jack Fisher was Mildreds first cousin.

[NI2924] Mildred was Jack's first cousin and daughter of William Thornhill and Cornelia Smuts. Jack Fisher was Mildreds first cousin

[NI2935] Mary never married.

[NI2947] Helen and Alfred had no children.

[NI2949] Leonard and Dorothy had no children.

[NI2950] Leonard and Dorothy had no children.

[NI2960] George never married.

[NI2961] Laura never married.

[NI2964] Aubrey and Ann had no children.

[NI2965] Aubrey and Ann had no children.

[NI2974] Killed at El-Alamein in WWII.

[NI2976] Maude was of Danish descent.

[NI2981] John died about 14 years of age.

[NI3011] Edith never married.

[NI3026] Martin was killed in a flying accident.

[NI3059] According to Arthurs death certificate, he died at Andrew Fleming Hospital (Parienyetwa, Hospital) in Salisbury, Rhodesia (Harare, Zimbabwe). He was cremated at Warren Hills Crematorium, Salisbury, Rhodesia (Harare, Zimbabwe). He was a Foreman. His cause of death is listed as Carcinoma of Oesophagus, his illness lasted 4 months.

[NI3061] Gerald was a fitter.

[NI3119] Benjamin was a silk dyer.

[NI3120] The Noquets were a French Hugenot family. They were silk weavers and dyers. A woman called Sarah Kearson was one of the witnesses to Elizabeths marriage the other being her older brother Robert.

[NI3122] Robert was a weaver.

[NI3129] George was a District Commissioner in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe)

[NI3132] "I know them, they lived in a large Victorian house, outside Leatherhead near the Chessington Road. Furnished in 'somber Victorian drab' with 'massive prints of Victorian hunting scenes, The relief of Mafeking and Kitchener in Sudan'
I recall a visit in 1940/1. Toilet paper was scarce during the war, the washrooms were stocked with old telephone books." Author unknown.

[NI3133] Kathleen was a vivacious blonde who drove sports cars and married a tenneis professional of Italian background, around 1938. They lived in Weybridge, Surrey. He became an RAF pilot.

[NI3147] Graham noted on his mothers death certificate "effects of V2 bomb." They were living at 34 Abbots Gardens, East Finchley. I saw the results of the rocket - some 15 houses were obliterated and others badly damaged. She was lying in the gutter covered in glass splinters, he in the house. He survived in good shape, she lived four months. We visited her in hospital, the ward of 40 beds were all from the same "incident".
David and Jean lived in the house for two years when they were first married.

[NI3739] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
Augustus was born at East Coker near Yoevil and was a bootmaker at Bridport in the 1850s. First wife, Caroline Needs and child died, possibly at time of child's birth. He then retired to Mosterton and moved to Frome to resume business as a bootmaker. Buried in churchyard of Holy Trinity, Frome.

[NI3742] Caroline died in childbirth.

[NI3775] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
lived to 86 years

[NI3776] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
lived to be 88 years

[NI3782] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
Edwin was a "valuable and ingenious foreman" of C & J Clark, boot manufacturers of Street;

[NI3783] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
Edwin P. Dodge married and lived at Redland, Bristol. He had one daughter, Beatrice and a son Arnold who emigrated.
He was a stockbroker's clerk like his father.

[NI3784] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
death date is questionable as is whether she was Edwin's wife. Not documented in MY file.

[NI3795] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
Albion lived most of his life at Waterloo House, Fareham, England as a draper

[NI3806] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
married twice

[NI3808] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
lived in Port Madoc

[NI3812] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
Sam married an actress

[NI3834] [Augustus_England2.FTW]

[NI3849] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
name of wife and children on file with DFA

[NI3850] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
name of wife and children on file with DFA

[NI3851] [Augustus_England2.FTW]
name of wife and children on file with DFA

[NI3855] Maria never married.

[NI3856] Catherina never married.

[NI3858] Wilhelmina never married.

[NI3863] Catherine was related to the painter.

[NI4124] Aletta is the sister of Georges brothers wife.

[NI4678] John was Town Clerk of Somerset East, Eastern Cape, South Africa in 1876 and was for many years a J.P., Town Auctioneer, Secretary to the Divisional Council and Inspector of Roads. He was organist at the local Dutch Reformed Church. From August 1890 until August 1891, he and Anne were Mayor and Mayoress of Somerset East.

[NI4679] Isaac was a missionary to the Griquas, Korannas and Bushmen, he was a friend of Robert Moffat and an associate of William Anderson.

[NI4689] Frank was a bank manager

[NI4692] Arthur was a ships purser in the Merchant Navy

[NI4693] John was an officer in the Merchant Navy he was killed in WWII.

[NI4695] William was a farmer.

[NI4696] Lennox was a farmer.

[NI4698] John was a farmer at Schoombee.

[NI4699] John was an engineer. For many years he was the Government Inspector of Machinery

[NI4702] John was the Master of Urban & Regional Town Planning. He was land surveyor in Paarl, Cape, South Africa. He worked on the Sichhon/Saldanha railway project.

[NI4703] Desmond was the deputy rector of Grey College, Port Elizabeth, Cape, South Africa.

[NI4705] Eric was a descendant of Thomas Henry Halse who was an 1820 settler. Eric was a farmer.

[NI4803] Henry was a distinguished member of the 1820 settler community, and was chosen to narrate the story of the Settlement at the Jubilee celebrations which took place in 1870. He had come to the Cape as a child of nine, and had served his apprenticeship as a saddler; after experiencing a religous conversion he had been received as a Methodist minister in 1834. Dugmore is said to have identified himself in sympathy and service with the African. He translated much of the New Testament into Xhosa.

[NI4954] Joan was a great granddaughter of John Hughes (see notes of Anna Cornelia Hudson)

[NI4965] See notes on Martha Jacoba Hudson. Kenneth and one son were drowned in a boating accident.

[NI5009] John lived in Belmont St. It was demolished in the mid 1800's to build the Glove Factories. The family moved to Park St., Yeovil, England

[NI5021] William was a labourer then a coal merchant

[NI5031] Bill was of Trowbridge, England

[NI5046] Brian was a carpenter and woodcarver

[NI5080] Early History

The name Horsfield seems to be derived from the Old English Hors + Feld and to mean 'a dweller at the Horse Field'.

According to family tradition our Horsfields were descended from a landed or even ducal family, the Horsforths, whose motto was 'He conquers who endures'. But no connection of this kind seems likely, and the crest used by Arthur Horsfield (cf p.327) was probably purchased in the nineteenth century. There is indeed a small town called Horsforth some 5 miles NW of Leeds, but Horsfield (with the occasional variant Horsefield), Horsfall and the like were common surnames in East Lancashire and West Yorkshire in the early nineteenth-century and Horsfield seems to have been particularly common in Sheffield and Ecclesfield.

My great-great-grandfather John Horsfield was born c.Aug 1790 - Aug 1791 somewhere in Yorkshire. He was married in Sheffield in 1812, and family tradition states that he was born there. Sheffield was an extensive parish, well-known for its blacksmiths and cutlers. In 1750 it already had a population of 20,000, and by 1800 this had risen to 46,000, of whom 31,500 lived in the township. It continued to grow rapidly throughout the nineteenth-century.

There are two Johns whose birth has so far been located in Sheffield c.1790-91. One, the (illegitimate) son of Hannah Horsefield, a spinster, was baptised at Sheffield parish church, now Sheffield cathedral, on 13th February 1791. The other, the second child of John Horsfield, a cutler and collier, and Sarah Ryals who married at Sheffield parish church on 22nd November 1789, was baptised at Ecclesall on 11th March 1792 but buried there on 22nd April 1792, so we are left only with the son of Hannah.

There is however a major problem in identifying our John with the 1791 son of Hannah. Our John progressed from blacksmith to boilermaker, and it seems likely that he had an elder brother William, a boilermaker born 1778, who was a 30-year-old widower living in the Holbeck area of Leeds when he married by licence Alice Loxley (born in Sheffield, but then living in Knobstrop, Leeds) at Leeds parish church on 15th September 1808. John moved from Sheffield to Leeds c.1817-24. But no trace has yet been found of a William, son of Hannah, born c.1778 .

A further point of interest is that our John gave 'Wood' as a second Christian name to three of his four sons. The only Horsfield/Wood link so far discovered at this period is the marriage of Elizabeth Horsfield to John Wood at Sheffield on 3rd November 1778. Could Elizabeth have been an elder sister of Hannah, and could our John have been brought up by her and her busband? Later records attest the births of an Amelia Wood Horsfield in 1881 in Halifax (Sep 1881, 9a 496) and a George Wood Horsfield c.1905 in Burnley (Mar 1905, 8e 268) .

JOHN HORSFIELD OF SHEFFIELD, LEEDS AND DEWSBURY

John Horsfield was born in Yorkshire c.1790-91, probably between 30th August 1790 and 29th August 1791. He was married in Sheffield, where the Horsfield family was well represented, and there is every reason to believe that he was born there. On present evidence, he was probably the illegitimate son of a Hannah Horsefield, and was baptised at Sheffield parish church on 13th February 1791.

John was married, as a 'bachelor of this parish' at the parish church on 1st April 1812 to Hannah Elshaw, a 'spinster of this parish'. Hannah, a daughter of William Elshaw, was born in 1785 at High Lane in the parish of Eckington, 6 miles SE of Sheffield just over the Derbyshire border, and baptised at Eckington parish church on 26th December 1785. Their three eldest children were born at Sheffield 1813-17, and John was described then as blacksmith and labourer. But by 1824 when their fifth child was born they had moved to Leeds, where they were living in York St, and John was now a boilermaker.

Almost certainly John had moved to Leeds by 1822 and entered into partnership with a Zebulun Stirk to establish the firm of Stirk and Horsfield of York St, described in the 1822 Baines Directory as 'Brass and Iron Founders, manufacturers of steam engines, flax spinning and mill machinery, water presses and gas light apparatus' . But the firm was not to survive long, and the Leeds Mercury for Saturday 7th February 1824 reported:

Yesterday morning, about a quarter past three o'clock, the extensive premises of
Messrs Stirk and Horsfield, iron founders, and machine makers in York Street, in
this town, were discovered to be on fire, and from the progress which the flames
had then made, it was evident that the fire must have raging for a considerable
time, and there must have been extreme negligence on the part of the watch in not
having sooner given the alarm. Engines belonging to the different fire companies
in the town were brought to the spot with evey possible expedition; but owing to
the scarcity of water, some time elapsed before they could render any efficient
assistance, and the roof of the building in which the fire originated, fell in very
soon after their arrival, and in a very short time there remained nothing but the
exterior walls. It was with great difficulty that the contiguous buildings which
contained much valuable machinery were preserved. Among the sufferers by this
destructive fire are Mr John Hilton, tobacco cutter, the whole of whose utensils
were destroyed, as well as a considerable quantity of tobacco; and Mr Charles
Atkinson, cloth friezer, who had the whole of his machinery and stock of goods
destroyed. The building was insured, but we are sorry to have to add, that no
insurance was effected on any part of the machinery. The total loss is estimated
at upwards of 5000.

John was still at York Street, Leeds, in December 1824, for it was then that his fifth child was baptised, but by 1827 when his youngest child was born he had parted from Stirk and moved to Dewsbury to make a fresh start.

Dewsbury is situated 27 miles NE of Sheffield and 8-10 miles S of Leeds, E of Halifax, NE of Huddersfield and W of Wakefield. According to tradition, its church was founded in 617 by St Paulinus, the first Archbishop of York, and the Saxon parish covered some 400 square miles. The woollen industry for which it was later famous existed as early as the thirteenth century, but it was essentially a cottage industry until the Industrial Revolution. In 1761 the population was only 409, but by 1831 this had grown to 16,261, of whom 8,272 lived in the actual township. In 1862 it was created a borough and in 1913 a county borough. Today, with a population of 60,000, it forms part of the Kirklees Metropolitan District in the County of West Yorkshire.

In 1827 John was described again as a blacksmith, but the 1890 Industries of Yorkshire, i.325, states that in 1828 he founded the Vulcan Iron Works, which were situated at Daw Green, Dewsbury. In Piggott's 1834 directory and also in White's 1837 directory he is described as a boiler maker of Daw Green. The 1841 directory gives his address as Vulcan Place, but he is listed at Daw Green in the 1841 census and again in the 1848 West Riding Poll Book.

John made his will on 19th May 1849, and he died at the Vulcan Works on 29th August 1849, aged 58, of paralysis (20 hrs, first attack). The Leeds Mercury (1 Sep 1849, p.8) referred to his death 'after a long and painful illness, aged 58, deeply regretted'. He was buried on 1st September 1849 in grave 64 of the graveyard then attached to the Centenary Chapel, Wellington Rd, Dewsbury. His estate amounted to less than 100, and his will contained the request 'that none of my children or my said dear wife wear any mourning at my decease'.

Hannah survived as an annuitant for another twenty-three years, and she continued to live in Dewsbury virtually next door to her two eldest sons, each of whom was now married and had his own home. In 1851 she was at Vulcan Place, in 1861 at Vulcan Street and in 1871 at Vulcan Street Flats. She died in Birkdale Rd on 28th October 1872, aged 86 or 87, of paralysis; her burial place has not been traced.

John and Hannah had at least twenty-two grandchildren in the male line, seventeen of whom survived to adulthood and, although there were other large Horsfield families in other West Riding towns, their own family came into particular prominence in Dewsbury and one of their descendants still lives there. But though they were probably the first Horsfields to settle in Dewsbury they were not the only ones, and the records at the Family History Centre attest 17 Horsfield births there from 1837-72 which cannot yet be linked with John and Hannah.

- - - - - -

The baptisms of five of John's six children have been traced, and all took place in the Church of England, but by 1831 he had apparently become a Methodist, and J.R.Robinson, Notes on Early Methodism in Dewsbury, Birstal, and Neighbourhood (second edn, Batley, nd c.1900, p.90) quotes from a Sunday School Minute Book for 1831 in which John's name is mentioned as one selected to seek contributions for the school.

John Wesley had preached in Dewsbury as early as 1742, and a Wesleyan Methodist Society was formed there in 1746 by his 'coadjutor', John Nelson of Birstall. A chapel was erected at Dawgreen in 1763, a circuit formed in 1785, another chapel erected at Westgate in 1790 and a Sunday School established in 1799. For fifty years after Wesley's death, however, many Wesleyans still resorted to their parish churches for the baptism of their children and for Holy Communion. Marriages could be solemnised only in parish churches until 1837, and the Dewsbury chapels were licensed for marriages only in the mid-1840s. John was probably one of those Wesleyans who drew no sharp distinction between church and chapel, and his three children who were married after 1845 were all married in church rather than chapel; his first grandchild was also baptised in the parish church. Yet of his continuing devotion to Methodism there is no doubt and, as we have noted, he was buried in a Wesleyan churchyard.

The family seems to have been especially associated with the Wesleyan Centenary Chapel. The building of this was first suggested in connection with the centenary of the beginning of John Wesley's evangelistic work. A centenary appeal was launched, and the list of those who contributed in 1839 (Robinson, p.141f) includes a Miss M Horsfield , perhaps an aunt of John. The Centenary Chapel was duly opened in 1840, and it still stands in Daisy Hill with the exterior largely unchanged, though the interior was modernised in the 1970s and it is now known as the Central rather than the Centenary church. At least eight of John's 17 Horsfield grandchildren were baptised there, and one of his great-great-great-grandchildren was baptised there as recently as 1945.

The Children of John and Hannah Horsfield

John and Hannah Horsfield had at least six children; the average lifespan of the five whose deaths have so far been traced was 70 years 10 months

1. JAMES WOOD
Born 12 Jul 1813, Sheffield
Bap 1 Aug 1813, SS Peter & Paul, Sheffield
For further details see below

2. JOSEPH WOOD
Born 19 Mar 1815, Sheffield
Baptised (Horsefield) 7 May 1815, SS Peter & Paul, Sheffield
Married (i) 7 May 1840, Dewsbury parish church, Mary Anne Wilman (bap 5 Oct 1814, Dewsbury), dau of Thomas Wilman, sadler, later liquer merchant
1840-41 boilermaker
1851 boilermaker, employing 20 men
1855 partner with brother James Wood in J & J Horsfield, boilermakers of Webster Hill
1861 boilermaker, master/partner
1871 boilermaker and ironfounder
Lived 1841-48 Daw Green
1849-61 Vulcan Place
1871 Vulcan Street
Mary Anne died 15 Dec 1873, a.59; left 106-7-3
Married (ii) 1 Jan 1875, Wesleyan Centenary Church Dewsbury, Mary France, of full age, spinster of Dewsbury, daughter of John France, deceased carpet manufacturer.
Lived 1878 West Park St; made will 18 May
1881 master engineer, living at Park Rd Birkdale, Dewsbury, alone with two servants (wife not located)
Died 21 Jun 1883, a.68
Left 5,665-0-1
Buried Dewsbury cemetery
Mary survived him; no further information
At least eight children from first marriage, four girls and four boys

3. ELIZABETH
Born 20 Mar 1817, Sheffield
Baptised (Horsefield) 13 Apr 1817, SS Peter & Paul, Sheffield
Married 9 May 1839, Dewsbury parish church, Henry Whitehead, of full age, manufacturing chemist of Thornhill, son of John Whitehead, clothes dresser
1851 Not in Dewsbury
1861 1 Top of Nursery, Thornhill Lees
1881 Ebenezer Terrace, Thornhill (a.67 sic; Henry a.64, 4562 140 39)
Henry died 1881-96; no will
1896 28 Alfred Place, Dewsbury
Died 14 Mar 1896, a.78, of 'constipation, bilious vomiting, spasms of stomach'
No will
At least nine children

4. WILLIAM WOOD
Born c.1819-20
Baptism not traced
1841: Not at home
1848 Lived in Dewsbury
Draper
Married 18 May 1848, Manchester Cathedral, Eliza Hughes, a.24 of Strangeways, Manchester, dau of John Hughes, glover
Alive 18 Jul 1850 (witness at wedding of brother, John Napoleon)
1851 Not in Dewsbury or Manchester
No further information, though one family tradition states 'believed to have been press-ganged'!

5. JOHN NAPOLEON
Born 25 Sep 1824, Leeds
Baptised 26 Dec 1824, Leeds parish church
Chemist and Druggist
Married 18 Jul 1850, Dewsbury parish church, Ellen Green, minor of Dewsbury (b. Halifax), dau of Richard Green, superintendent constable
Lived 1851 42 Sweet St, Holbeck, Leeds
1871-91 81-83 Sweet St, Holbeck, Leeds
Entered in 1881 census as John 'Apden' Horsfield
Made will Aug 1883
Died 17 Jan 1891, a.66
Left 10,568-4-8
Ellen, of Swanland House, Swanland Av, Bridlington, died 6 Apr 1904, a.73; left 968-7-5
At least five children, three girls and two boys

6. ANN
Born 18 Jan 1827
Baptised 16 Apr 1827, Dewsbury parish church
Married 9 Nov 1948, Dewsbury parish church, John Bagshaw, a.20 (b. Bradford), iron-founder of Dewsbury, son of James Bagshaw, iron-founder
Lived 1851 Gas Lane, Dewsbury
1881 Bradford Rd West, Batley
1893 9 Ash Grove, Harrogate
Died 22 May 1893, a.66, of angina and 'sudden failure of the heart's action'.
No will.
JB, gentleman of 9 Ash Grove, Harrogate, d 17 Apr 1897; left 6,702-18-10
Nine children

JAMES WOOD HORSFIELD OF SHEFFIELD, LEEDS AND DEWSBURY

Born 12 Jul 1813, Sheffield
Baptised 1 Aug 1813, SS Peter & Paul, Sheffield
c.1817-14 moved with parents to Leeds
c.1825-26 moved with parents to Dewsbury
1836+ Boilermaker
Married 4 Aug 1836, Dewsbury parish church, to Jane Eliza Whitehead (bap 27 Mar 1815, Dewsbury), dau of William Whitehead, cloth-dresser, of Dewsbury
1841-48 lived at Daw Green
1849 with brother Joseph Wood took over father's business on his death
1851 'boilermaker employing 20 men', living at Vulcan Place
1855 first reference to firm of 'J and J Horsfield, boilermakers of Webster Hill'
1861 'boilermaker, master, employing 39 men and 11 boys', living in Vulcan
Street
1871-81 ironfounder, living at Park Villa, West Park Street, Birkdale (on corner of
Park Rd)
Made will 23 Nov 1885
Died 24 Jan 1888, a.74, at Park Villa of 'emphysema of lungs, bronchitis, coma'
Buried Dewsbury cemetery
Left 5,044-9-5
JE died 20 Apr 1889, a.74 of 'mitral incompetency, oedema'; buried with James Wood
Nine children

James' life was closely bound up with that of his brother Joseph. Both followed their father as boilermakers, and after his death they became partners in the family firm in which at least four of their sons followed them. Throughout their married lives they lived very close to each other, sometimes next door, and they were both pillars of the Wesleyan Centenary Chapel; they are referred to by Robinson, p.151, and a full-page photograph of each of them appears in his book. They were separated only by Joseph's death on 21st June 1883, and their family graves are almost opposite each other.
The Vulcan Works

The extract reproduced on the next page is from the volume already noted, Industries of Yorkshire, 1890. The works founded by John Horsfield were extended by his sons James and Joseph who carried on business as 'J and J Horsfield'. Although a variant, 'J.W. Horsfield & Co Ltd', appeared in 1916, the original title, first noted in 1855, has also been noted in 1898, 1910, 1948 and 1967.

In this last year, 1967, the Official Guide to Dewsbury stated that
Mild steel pressure vessels for air or steam pressure are made at the Vulcan Iron
Works of J and J Horsfield Ltd. Founded in 1828, Horsfields are still a family
concern today. They export widely, and among their more interesting products
are timber impregnation plants for protecting railway sleepers and telegraph poles.

This same guide carried the following advertisement:
J & J HORSFIELD LTD
Makers of
HIGH-PRESSURE STEAM BOILERS
And other similar vessels
NEW FLUE AND FIRETOXES
ELECTRICAL AND OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING AND
OTHER REPAIRS
Steam Valves and other Fittings supplied and overhauled
VULCAN IRONWORKS - DEWSBURY

Shortly after this, in October 1969, the Vulcan Iron Works closed and a decade or so later they were mostly in ruins. Happily, however, twenty or so photographs of the works were taken c.1970 before they were demolished or fell into disrepair, and these were preserved in Dewsbury Library. Meanwhile the firm itself still survived as J and J Horsfield (Clayton & Son & Co Ltd), Boiler Repairers, Moor End Works, Leeds 10.

Census Records

1841 Dawson's Green (HO/107/1268/ED8/f.24)

4 John Horsfield 50(-54) Boiler Maker Yorkshire
Hannah 55(-59) Yorkshire
John 15 Yorkshire
Ann 14 Yorkshire

1 James Horsfield 25(-29) Boiler Maker Yorkshire
Jane 25(-29) Yorkshire
William 3 Yorkshire

1851 Vulcan Place (HO/107/2324/f.289-90)

Hannah Horsfield Head Wid 65 Annuitant Derbys, High Lane

James Wood H'field Head Marr 37 Boilermaker empl 20 men Sheffield
Jane Eliza Wife Marr 36 do Dewsbury
William Woo Son 13 Scholar Dewsbury
Ann Eliza Dau 9 Scholar Dewsbury
Hannah Dau 6 Scholar Dewsbury
Charles Son 4 Scholar Dewsbury
Betsey Dau 2 -- Dewsbury
also servant

1861 Vulcan Street (Hannah & James) & Vulcan Place (Joseph) (RG/9/3409/ED3/f.55)

Hannah Horsfield Head Wid 75 -- Derbys, Eckington

James W Horsfield Head Marr 47 Boilermaker Master* Sheffield
Jane E Wife Marr 46 -- Dewsbury
Whitehead Son Unm 23 Mechanic Dewsbury
Ann E Dau Unm 19 -- Dewsbury
Hannah Dau Unm 16 -- Dewsbury
Betsy Dau Unm 12 Scholar Dewsbury
James Son Unm 9 Scholar Dewsbury
Arthur Son Unm 6 Scholar Dewsbury
Sarah J Dau Unm 4 -- Dewsbury
* employing 39 men and 11 boys

1871 RG/10/4603

Vulcan Street Flats (ED 16 f.17)
Hannah Horsfield Head Wid 85 Annuitant Sheffield

Park Villa (ED 15, f.110)
James W Horsfield Head Marr 57 Ironfounder Sheffield
Jane E Wife Marr 56 -- Dewsbury
Charles Son Unm 24 Ironfounder Dewsbury
Arthur Son Unm 17 Ironfounder Dewsbury
also servant

1881 Park Rd, Birkdale (4562 34 2 & 36 5)

James Wood H'field Head Marr 67 Iron-founder Sheffield
Jane Eliza Wife Marr 66 -- Dewsbury
Ann Eliza Dau Unm 38 -- Bradford (sic)
Jane Eliza Thompson G'dau Unm 10 -- Bradford
also servant

Victoria Crescent, Dewsbury (4562 37 8)
Hannah Dodge Head Widow 36 b.Dewsbury
Edith Lizzie Dau Scholar 10 Stamford, Lincs
James Horsfield Son Scholar 8 Bakewell, Derbyshire
Beatrice Ethel Dau Scholar 5 Thorncliffe, Yorks
Samuel Brickhill Son 3 Thorncliffe, Yorks
N.W. Thomlinson Boarder Wesleyan Minister 27 Escomb, Durham

Park Rd, Birkdale
Charles Horsfield 34
Martha Elizabeth 29
Sarah Jane 8
Minnie Ethel 7
Hilda Mary 5
Norma Maria 1
Frederick J.C. 1
Lucy Cocker 13 Sister-in-law Unmarried 13 Female Scholar
+ one servant

The Children of James Wood Horsfield

James Wood and Jane Eliza Horsfield had nine children, all born in Dewsbury. Their average life-span was 48.5 years.

1. WILLIAM WHITEHEAD
Birth reg Oct-Dec 1837, Dewsbury reg dist
Baptised 25 Feb 1838, Dewsbury parish church
Mechanic, then Engineer and Boiler-Maker
Married (i) 7 Jan 1869 WCC Dewsbury Jane Eliza Greaves, a.24, of Springfield Terrace, Dewsbury, dau of James Greaves, decd coal proprietor, who died Oct-Dec 1869, a.24
Married (ii) 31 Jul 1872 Thornhill parish church Rachel Emma Charlesworth of Middlestown, dau of Joseph Charlesworth, farmer
Lived 1881-1915, Vulcan House, Vulcan Rd, Dewsbury
1898 partner in 'J & J Horsfield' with cousin Thomas Wilman Horsfield
1901 inherited from sister Ann Eliza portrait of their father
Rachel Emma died 23 Oct 1914, Dewsbury reg dist, a.73; buried Dewsbury cemetery; left 904-10-0
Died 28 Feb 1915, a.77
Buried Dewsbury cemetery
Left 30,960-7-1.
Three children, one boy and two girls

2. JOHN HENRY
Birth reg Jan-Mar 1840, Dewsbury reg dist
Baptised 12 Apr 1840, Dewsbury parish church
Buried 28 Apr 1841, WCC, a.15 months

3. ANN ELIZA
Born 5 Jan 1842
Baptised 17 Feb 1842, WCC Dewsbury
Unmarried
Lived 1881 at home with parents
1901 Victoria Crescent, Dewsbury
Died 21 Mar 1901, a.59
Buried Dewsbury cemetery
Left 1,000-10-8, including gold watch to sister-in-law, Martha Elizabeth Horsfield

4. HANNAH
Birth reg Oct-Dec 1844, Dewsbury reg dist
Married (i) 13 Jan 1870, WCC Dewsbury, Samuel Dodge (b.1841, Manchester) Wesleyan minister (Manchester; 1865, Ramsey IOM; 1867, Appleby; 1869, Stamford) of Stamford, son of James Lea Dodge, stock and share broker
Lived 1870, Stamford
1873, Sheffield circuit
SD died 12 Jul 1877 of consumption at Chapeltown nr Sheffield (Wortley reg dist), a.36; left under 300.
Returned to Dewsbury.
Lived 1881: Victoria Crescent (with NWT as lodger)
Married (ii) 9 Aug 1882, WCC Dewsbury, Nicholas William Thomlinson, Wesleyan minister (born Escomb, Durham; 1878, instituted; 1879, Harrogate; 1880, Dewsbury)
1883, Woodhouse Grove
1886, Burnley
1889, Sunderland
1892, Coventry
1895, Torquay; living at Wesley Manse, Torquay
1898, Leeds
1901, Huddersfield, Queens St
1904, Leeds; living at 2 Middleton Crescent, Hunslet
1907, Bradford
1910, Batley
1913+, Leeds
Lived 1913-16 at 8 Richmond Rd, Headingley, Leeds
NWT died 11 Oct 1926 at Leeds, a.72; left 4,193-19-7
On death of NWT, went to live with surviving daughter at St John's Vicarage, Ryde, Isle of Wight
Died 26 Aug 1930, a.85
Left 285-7-11
At least seven children, four by first marriage and three by second

5. CHARLES
Born 29 Mar 1847, Vulcan Place, Dewsbury
Baptised 27 May 1847, Wesleyan Centenary Chapel, Dewsbury
1861 Away from home at the census
1869+ Wesleyan local preacher
1871 Ironfounder (census) and bookkeeper (marriage certificate) living with parents at Park Villa, West Park Street, Birkdale, Dewsbury
Married 8 Jun 1871 at Wesleyan Centenary Chapel, Dewsbury, Martha Elizabeth Cocker, a.20, dau of Joseph Cocker, bank cashier of Dewsbury
1872+ boilermaker and ironfounder
1872-73 lived at Ashworth Terrace,Wormald St, Dewsbury
1875+ lived at Park Villa, West Park Street, Birkdale, Dewsbury
Council member of Dewsbury Chamber of Commerce
Leader of Young Men's class at Moorlands Wesleyan Church
Died 5 Nov 1885, a.38, at 2 Park Villa of 'bronchitis, several weeks; congestion of
the lungs, 6 days; broncho-pneumonia, 24 hours'
Buried 9 Nov 1885 in family grave at Dewsbury Cemetery
Left 694-14-6
ME moved before 1891 to the Bank House (flat above Midland Bank) in Easthorpe, Mirfield, a small town 3.5 miles SW of Dewsbury.
Moved to The Clough, on the Battyeford side of Mirfield, in shadow of house to which Community of the Resurrection moved in 1898
Moved again to Lea Green, Mirfield.
c.1900 Moved to Lightcliffe, a small town 3 miles E of Halifax, but not really happy there
c.1901-02 Moved to Station Road, Ainsdale, Southport, some 5 miles from Halsall, to be near eldest daughter now married
Moved to 95 Burnley Road, Ainsdale.
Lived May 1909+ 44 Denmark Road, Churchtown
May 1918+ 60 Denmark Road, Churchtown
Moved 1923-24 to 37 Wennington Roe, Roe Lane
Died 18 Jun 1943, a.92, at 37 Wennington Road of 'Haematemesis, Arterio Sclerosis and Senility'
Buried at Duke Street Cemetery, Southport.
Six children, four girls and two boys

6. BETSEY
Born 25 Mar 1849
Bap 12 Jul 1849, WCC Dewsbury
Married 1 Dec 1868, WCC Dewsbury, Joseph Henry Thompson, a.20, of Overton, bookkeeper later stone merchant, son of John Myers Thompson, draper
Lived 1870-75 Bradford
1877-80 Dewsbury
1881 Not in England
1901 46 Victoria Crescent, Dewsbury
1915 probably at Worthing
No further definite information, but probably died Oct-Dec 1924, East Preston reg dist, a.75; intestate
JHT probably died Oct-Dec 1928, East Preston reg.dist, a.78; intestate
At least four children

7. JAMES
Born 11 or 19 May 1851
Bap 3 Jul 1851, WCC Dewsbury
Died 22 Apr 1865, a.13
Buried Dewsbury cemetery

8. ARTHUR
Born 4 Oct 1854
Bap 23 Nov 1854, WCC Dewsbury
Educated at Horton College, Bradford
1873 Started business at J & J Horsfield
Married 31 Jul 1879, St Peter Horbury, Hannah Baines of Horbury, second dau of Edward Baines, worsted manufacturer of Dewsbury
Lived 1881 Spinkwell House, Horbury
1888-1928 High Bank, Tithe Bank St, Horbury.
Became Assistant Manager of Horbury Junction Iron Company Ltd; later Chairman and Managing Director
Freemason
1888 Member of Horbury Local Board
1894 Elected as Liberal Unionist in first elections for Urban District Council
1895 Elected trustee of Common Lands Trust, Horbury's main charitable trust
1901 21st birthday of his eldest son marked by 'a general holiday in the village'
1902 director of Charles Roberts & Co, railway waggon builders, Horbury Junction
1902 member of the Iron and Steel Institute, 'in connection with which he has visited America, Canada, France, Belgium, Germany, Spain and Sweden'
1902 member of the Mining Institute
1902 member of Wakefield Chamber of Commerce
1904-05 Chairman of Horbury Urban District Council
1905 now a JP for West Riding, laid foundation stone of present public library
1912 recreations: shooting, motoring and golf; club: Leeds and County
Hannah died 3 Jun 1922, a.67; left 3,452.8-10
Died 24 Apr 1928, a.73
Buried 27 Apr 1928, Horbury cemetery
Obituary 28 Apr 1928, Wakefield Express p.8
Left 33,646
Cf W.H. Scott and W.T. Pike, West Riding of Yorkshire Contemporary Biographies, Brighton 1902, p.302; Yorkshire Who's Who, 1912, p.206f; also R.D. Worrall, Some Horbury Yesterdays, c.1973, where he is described as a 'dominant figure in the early days of Horbury's iron age'. On p.36 Worrall relates of High Bank that 'In 1970, as part of the garden at the rear was being prepared for building of new old people's flatlets, a series of ornamental brick arches had to be demolished. The workmen found a bottle embedded in the brickwork. Inside were two copies of the "Yorkshire Evening Post" dated February 23 and March 29 1900 as well as a letter. The letter said that the archways were built by Mr Arthur Horsfield ... in memory of "The gallant defence of Mafeking, Kimberley and Ladysmith in the South African War".'
Three children, one boy and two girls

9. SARAH JANE
Born 9 Oct 1856
Bap 22 Nov 1856, WCC Dewsbury
Died 26 May 1871, a.14
Buried Dewsbury cemetery

[NI5137] This is the couple who went from England to New Foundland, Canada in 1647 then to Block Island, Rhode Island in USA.

[NI5143] This couple with their children were the first Tristram Dodge's to settle on Block Island, Rhode Island, USA

[NI5168] [Gearld.GED]

Military service: basic training @ Ft. Knox, Kentucky: August 1972 - November 1972. AIT @ Ft. Belvoir, Virginia: November 1972 - January 1973. Ft. Riley, Kansas 1st Infrantry Division: January 1973 - February 1977. Frankfort, Germany, V Corps Headquarters February 1977 - April 1980. Pentagon, Telecommunications: April 1980 - April 1983. Oslo, Norway, AFNORTH Headquarters: April 1983 - July 1987. Ft. Leavenworth, KS, HQ CAC: July 1987 - August 1990, Bad Kreutznach, Germany, 1st Armored Division: August 1990 - September 1992. After retiring from the US Army Phill went to work for the government as a civilian on Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas. He works as an Environmental Inspector in the housing units on post, inspecting and doing risk assessments in units that have lead base paint.

[NI5169] [Gearld.GED]

Spent Labor Day weekend 1997 in the hospital after having orthopedic surgery to the right ankle for a fracture/dislocation. The ankle now has two screws on the inside and a metal bar about 7 inches long up the outside of the ankle. This happened while trying to unstick a fishing line for her nephew. The creek bank was slippery. Not the recommended way to spend your summer vacation time!

Magic in the Moonlight
Published in the Fall 1997 issue of "Oatmeal & Poetry"

It was 3:30 A.M. as I paced the long, tiled hallway waiting for word from the surgeon. My child was on the operating table undergoing emergency surgery for a burst appendix. Through the stained and frost encrusted windows I could see the clouds covering up the moon and stars. My footsteps echoed hollowly in the cavernous, deserted hallway. I thought I was alone in that hospital waiting area, but as I turned to go back the way I had come, I saw an elderly gentleman at the water fountain. He was not very tall and his stance was kind of stooped over. He had a full head of snow white hair and a bright smile that lit up his whole face.

I had no idea where he came from. It seemed as though he just appeared out of thin air. He introduced himself to me as Ralph. "Fine it is, everything will be," he told me, "ye need not to worry." I asked him if he had ever had a child who needed emergency surgery? His answer was 'no,' but he assured me again that everything would be all right. I became upset and told him he had no way of knowing things like that, and to just butt-out of things that didn't concern him. The light went out of his eyes and he backed away from me as though he were frightened.

Just at that moment the clouds gave way and the moonlight shone through the stained and frosted windows. The designs it made on the white tile floor of the hospital hallway were breathtakingly beautiful. I couldn't explain it, but the beautiful display of moon light lifted my spirits and gave me hope.

Suddenly, Ralph was smiling again and coming toward me. He said to me, "It's glad I am that ye can see the magic in the moonlight. I know now for absolutely, certain, sure that everything will be all right with yer little un, what's the child's name?" I told him my daughter's name is Brandy and she's only six years old. He said, "anyone who can see the magic is sure to have only good things happen to them and their loved ones." As he prattled on I became aware of the odd way in which he was dressed and the funny way he had of turning a phrase. It occurred to me then to ask Ralph why he was in the hospital surgical waiting area. "Why I've come to wait with ye so that yer wouldn't be so scared," he told me. I asked him how he knew that I was there and the answer I got surprised me. "Well now, I be here 'cause I be Brandy's guardian angel don't ye know," Ralph said with a bewildered look on his face. "Didn't ye know about me before today? I've talked with Brandy several times before . . . she never mentioned me huh?"

Brandy had told me that she had a secret, invisible friend. I didn't think anything about it at the time, thinking it was just a phase that all kids go through. Ralph assured me that he was not a figment of Brandy's imagination; that he was always somewhere close by keeping watch over her. He also confided in me that I must surely have my own guardian angel if I could see the magic in the moonlight. Ralph said that most people do have guardian angels and just don't realize it.

He asked me to think about how many times in the past something that could have been awful turned into something great. As I thought about it, I realized that throughout my life there have been many situations that could have been really awful but at the last minute something always seems to turn the situation into a positive experience. Ralph told me this was my own guardian angel at work. He asked me to think about how wretched the world is, and to wonder how, without help, people would be able to get through each day. I began to understand what he meant and was all the more grateful for his being there with me in the hospital.

Ralph was absolutely right! Everything turned out fine. Brandy came home from the hospital after three days. I told her that I met Ralph while she was on the operating table and she didn't believe me, "Yeah right, Mom," she said. I just smiled and waved at Ralph as I walked
out of her room. I'm so glad to know that there really are guardian angels watching over us. Next time you see the moonlight shining in your window, look for the magic and maybe, just maybe, you'll meet your guardian angel.

Travel Jitters
Published in the Spring 1998 issue of "Oatmeal & Poetry"

Have you ever been so scared and nervous about something you felt like you were going to be sick? That is exactly how I felt the first time I rode on an airplane. It was not only my first plane ride but also my first trip overseas as a military wife. My husband had left to report to his new duty station in Germany four months prior. This left the job of getting things packed up and ready to go, and clearing living quarters as my responsibility. As a private first class, my husband had to be on a waiting list for housing. When housing became available it was time for me, my teen-age sister, and Christopher, my two-year-old son to make the journey on our own.

We were each allowed only one piece of luggage with a weight limit of forty pounds per piece. Deciding what to pack, and then packing what we needed to take with us for use until our household goods' shipment arrived took three footlockers. I waited until the very last minute to close them up because they were packed as tight as I could get them. My father-in-law had to sit on them for me to get them closed. I prayed the locks would not spring open and spill everything out. I could only hope I had made the right decision about what we would need while we waited for the rest of our belongings to arrive.

During the two weeks prior to our departure, we watched several movies on television about airplane mishaps. I realize now that this was just a coincidence, but at the time I felt like somebody was trying to tell me something. My father-in-law told me repeatedly we would be flying over the Bermuda Triangle and that there was every possibility our flight would be one that disappeared. This only added to my anxiety even though I knew he was just teasing me. Saying good-bye to family and friends and not knowing for sure when we would see them again was the scariest thing I had ever done in my young life.

We left Indianapolis International Airport and went to Charleston, South Carolina. Christopher and I both had problems with air sickness for the first half of the flight. I was thankful to find another military wife on her way to Germany on the same flight. If she had not taken us under her wing at Charleston, we probably would never have made it to Germany at all. At Charleston airport we had to claim our luggage and go by shuttle bus to Charleston Air Base. We were not told this at the travel office at Fort Benjamin Harrison. They just told us there would be a lay over at Charleston. Thank goodness military wives look out for each other! Once we were settled on board the Military Airlift Command plane at the air base, things calmed down. The rest of the trip from Charleston to Frankfort was uneventful.

When we finally touched down at Frankfort, I had the horror of getting through customs at a military air base with a two-year-old child and a teen-ager in tow. After successfully claiming our three footlockers, we waited in line for the customs inspectors. The person in front of us in line was an active duty soldier with one duffel bag. The customs agent made this soldier dump out his duffel bag and he was going through everything, even unrolling the man's socks. I was appalled! I knew if he was going to go through three tightly packed footlockers like that we would be there all day. I was afraid I would not even be able to get everything back into the footlockers if I had to empty them. Just as the inspector finished with the soldier in front of us, Christopher, my two-year-old son started fussing about having to "go potty Mommy." I was trying to quiet him but he kept getting louder and more insistent. Two-year-old children who are just recently potty trained can be very insistent when they need to go. We were getting a lot of sympathetic looks from the other people waiting in line, but there was no bathroom on our side of the customs gate. Trying to tell a child who has to go to the bathroom that you can not take him just does not work. Mommy is supposed to be in control and take care of things like that. The soldier in front of us had not even finished re-packing his duffel bag when the customs inspector looked at our footlockers and asked me, "Do you have anything in there you shouldn't?" I am sure he could tell by the terrified look on my face that this was a whole new experience for me. I did not want to open those footlockers; not because there was anything in them that should not be there, but because I was afraid I would not be able to get everything back into them. I shook my head no and stammered, "I don't think so." He just grinned and pointed us in the direction of the closest bathroom. He even helped me get the footlockers through the gate.

My husband was there on the other side of the gate waiting for us. Christopher was so excited about seeing his Dad that he forgot about having to go to the bathroom, but only for a minute. Dad's first job after giving everybody a big hug was to take the kid to the toilet. All the fear and the worry had been worth it to get our family back together again.

[NI5170] [Gearld.GED]

While attending Oslo American School got to go on field trips to Copenhagen, Denmark (twice), Legoland in Denmark, went on winter survival outing with the cub scouts and built an igloo and dug a snow cave. Christopher met his wife via a chat room on the internet. He and Katherine got married on Driftwood Beach on Jeykll Island in Georgia. The tide didn't cooperate as planned so the wedding was not in the exact location on the beach that they had selected, but it was a beautiful wedding nonetheless.

[NI5171] [Gearld.GED]

When Patrick was in Kindergarten we lived in Oslo (Nesoya) Norway. While out playing in the snow he slipped and ran a tree branch into his right eye. It was a weekend and we had no phone. Fortunately the American community in Oslo was pretty small and everyone knew where everyone else lived. We rushed him over to where the Air Force doctor lived and he called the local childrens hospital for us. We took him to the emergency room there. The doctor was waiting at the door for us. She spent several hours with Patrick checking and rechecking his vision. She wanted to admit Patrick but we were reluctant to allow that as the hospital would not allow either of us to stay with him overnight. We signed a waiver of responsibility and took him home. The doctor recommended that Patrick wear an eye patch and that he avoid all rough housing. There was no internal damage to his eye and he has better eyesight than any of the rest of us. We did have a quiet couple of weeks - the doctor had told us that any kind of rough housing might cause more blood vessels in Patrick's eye to rupture and if that happened he would definately have to be hospitalized. Any time he got too rowdy all I had to do was mention the hospital and he settled right down.

[NI5179] [Gearld.GED]

Russ was in the US Navy during World War II, in fact that's where he and Mom met. He was an underwater demolitions expert. As he was defusing an underwater mine his teather was suddenly cut. When he surfaced he found that his ship had left him behind when they saw a Japanese ship approaching. He was captured and spent 2 years in a Japanese prisoner of war camp. He didn't talk about it much, I think it was too painful for him. He and Mom divorced when I was 3 years old so I didn't know him very well for most of my childhood. The divorce was not exactly amicable; so all the things I heard about him when the grownups didn't know I was close enough to hear what they were saying was never good. When I turned 13, he took Mom back to court asking the judge to give him custody. I was terrified! To the best of my recollection I had only seen this man twice from the time of the divorce and the time that we went back to court. I didn't know this man at all and here was a judge telling me that I had to go live with him. He was a very strict, unbending and unforgiving person. We never got along very well, we tolerated each other and that was about the extent of it. I left my Dad's house as soon as I turned 18. When I met Phill and knew for sure that we were going to marry I took him to meet my Dad and stepmom.....what a mistake that was. Dad never liked Phill and never accepted the fact that I loved him and intended to spend the rest of my life with him. As we walked down the church aisel Dad said to me, "you can still change your mind you know." His attitude toward Phill kept us away after we married. We saw Dad and Rose (stepmom) only 3 times in 25 years. We did talk on the phone fairly regularly but I refused to put Phill through the unpleasantness of visiting him. He died a bitter lonely man because he had driven all his children away, not just me.

[NI5181] [Gearld.GED]

Lynn is a very strange person. Just because she's my sister doesn't mean that I can't say things like that - it's true! She has a medical (mental) condition called "multiple personality disorder." She has four distinct personalities that I am aware of and none of them are very nice people. Who knows how many more there actually are. As long as she takes her medicine she's tolerable. The thing is, she doesn't think she needs to take the medicine so she frequently doesn't. She has been in and out psyche wards so many times that I have lost count. She once bragged to me about doing exotic dancing in Las Vegas during a time when I knew for certain that she was in hospital.

[NI5182] [Gearld.GED]

Everybody called him Rusty. He enlisted in the US Air Force right out of high school and he served two years in Viet Nam. As was the case with so many Viet Nam Veterans, Rusty never truly left Viet Nam behind. I can recall several times when I was with him in an outdoor setting when he would fall to the ground holloring "incoming" or "take cover." This was usually brought about by the sound of a low flying plane or the sound of a kid running a stick along a picket fence. After he got out of the Air Force Rusty worked in the construction business. He did roofing and guttering. Rusty had a drinking problem for most of his adult life which I believe was a direct result of his service in Viet Nam. He never asked the Veterans Administration for help though; he didn't think he had a problem. However, it was apparent to everyone who knew him. No autopsy was done when he died, but the medical examiner told us that it was probably from a massive heart attack or an anuerism. He went very quickly. He was on his way up the stairs to go to bed and he just fell down dead. At least he didn't suffer and hopefully he is in a better place now.

[NI5183] [Gearld.GED]

Her nickname for all of her life has been Trinket. She was such a small baby when she was born a friend of Mom's said something to the effect of, "she's just a little trinket that I could put in my pocket and take home." From then on she was called Trinket. Mom worked and we lived in a very small town (Brooklyn, Indiana). For the first 5 years of Trinket's life we lived with our aunt and uncle while Mom worked in the city (Indianapolis). After a while when Mom was able to buy a car she got an apartment in Brooklyn and Trinket and I then lived with her. Mom felt comfortable letting me watch Trinket because she knew that I could go to any neighbor for help if I needed it, which I frequently did. One time while Trinket and I were home alone she fell while playing in the yard and cut her forearm open on a broken brick. She required about 6 stitches that time. Another time when we were in an upstairs apartment, she went dashing down the stairs to go outside to play. The storm door was locked and she ran her arm right through the window. I think she had about 13 or 14 stitches that time. Even though she is only 6 years my junior, I truly did help raise her.

[NI5188] [Gearld.GED]

Gayle is actually the daughter of my sister Evelyn Marie (Lynn). When she was born Lynn was going to put her up for adoption so Mom took her in and Lynn signed all the papers to relinquish parental rights. Gayle did not know this until about 1999 when Lynn's first husband, David Guffey, told her in a fit of meanness.

[NI5193] [Gearld.GED]

Some sort of cousin to the cheese family

[NI5196] [Gearld.GED]

John German (farmer) had the first stop in the underground railway north of the Ohio river. Mom's Grandmother could remember the children were told to stay away from certain parts of the farm for certain periods of time. John German was traced to Lord George (??) Germaine - a close buddy of George III. I have not been able to confirm these statements. This is information passed on from my Grandmother to my Mom to me.

[NI5197] [Gearld.GED]

Sarah Crist has been traced back to time of the Revolution - with people in the war. Somehow, we are supposedly related in some manner to Molly Pritchard, however I have not been able to confirm either of these statements. This is information that was passed on from my Grandmother to my Mom to me.

[NI5208] [Gearld.GED]

Phillip Lampe was a Prussian. Phillip was killed unloadin an Anhouser Busche beer wagon, beer barrels rolled off the wagon and crushed him.

[NI5209] [Gearld.GED]

She was from Schromberg in province of Lippea, northern Germany. This family has been traced back to 12th century in that area, where at one time they had a duchey

After Phillip's death Lean Mary married Frederick Schroeder and they had 1 son Albert.

[NI5294] [Gearld.GED]

Robert immigrated to the colonies in 1748. He is best known as the financier of the American Revolutionary War. He used his personal fortune to back the Revolutionary War. He signed the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Articles of the Confederation. He founded the country's first government incorporated bank. He was the first Secretary of the Treasury, a member of the Continental Congress and a Senator from Pennsylvania. All of these accomplishments did not, however, keep him from spending 3 years in debtors prison towards the end of his life. He died five years after his release from debtors prison, broken in spirit and fortune. He was buried in the yard of Christ Church.

[NI5305] [Gearld.GED]

Robert came to America in 1738 and settled in Oxford, Maryland. He was wounded by Ship's salute, died of blood poisoning 7 days later. He is buried at White Marsh burial ground, St. Peter's Parish, 5 miles from Oxford, Talbot County, Maryland.

[NI5315] [Gearld.GED]

Sarah was generously provided for in Robert Morris Sr.'s will. He left a substancial amount to her (and probably his) daughter "Sarah" and another substantial amoount to the as yet unborn child she carried at the time of his death. The unborn child was Thomas Wise Morris Jr., half brother to Robert Morris Jr.

[NI5353] [Gearld.GED]

James left Harlow as a young man and settled in Beaumaris. He is buried in the parish churchyard in Beaumaris.

[NI5361] [Gearld.GED]

Robert was engaged to Miss Mary Clare when he died

[NI5363] [Gearld.GED]

Corbett died in Montpelier, France at the age of 26; he is buried there. Richard Topham went there at the time of his death and had a stone erected. Corbett Harris was to have been married to a Miss Smedley of Holy Well. Her father's house was near the 'well'.

[NI5371] [Gearld.GED]

John was a physician in London. He lived in Golden Square. He was sent by the government to Channel Islands officially at the time of the cholera epidemic. He died just after his return.

[NI5372] [Gearld.GED]

William Rice was a manufacturing chemist. He lived in Dublin. He never married; had no children.

[NI5379] [Gearld.GED]

William and his family emigrated to Prince Edward Island in 1856

[NI5396] [Gearld.GED]

William is buried in St. Peter's Cathedral cemetary in Parksdale, just outside Charlottetown, PEI. He was an architect and he never married.

[NI5398] [Gearld.GED]

From a legal agreement concerning Elizabeth Putnam, widow of Robert Harris, ir states that George Robinson and Sarah were living in Vancover, British Columbia. The agreement was dated March 20, 1919.

[NI5400] [Gearld.GED]

Edward was an Episcopal Minister. The Reverand Canon Harris did extensive research into the families in preparation for a book on the history of Lunenburg. Unfortunately the book was never written, but most all of the family history in this computer file is information derived from his extensive handwritten notes.

[NI5404] [Gearld.GED]

On April 8, 182, an entry was made in the Land Office records showing Isaac Morris purchased 165.60 acres of land, Range 8, Township 7, Section 36, in what is now Noble County, Marion Township. (page 159) In 182 this section was in Guernsey County.

The 1814 Guernsey County Tax list show Isaac Morris paying taxes on 40 acres of land Range 8, Township 7, Section 36. In 1814, this section was still in Guernsey County.

On February 10, 1817, a deed was issued to Isaac Morris for land Range 8, Township 7, Section 36, by James Madison, then President of the United States. Records show the land was sold by the United States to Isaac Morris. In 1817, this section was still in Guernsey County.

The 1820 census list an Isaac Morris; Guernsey County, Richland Township, engaged in agriculture; 2 males 10 to 16 (Abraham would be 12, Isaac Jr. 9); 1 male 26 to 45 (Isaac would be 43); 3 females under 10 (Anna could have been one?); 1 female 10 to 16 (Nancy); 1 female 16 to 26 (Sarah 18); and 1 female 26 to 45 (Maryan).

Isaac Morris gave his consent for the marriage of his daughter, Nancy to Joseph Frazee, in Belmont County, on February 26, 1826.

The 1830 census shows 1 male 5 to 10 (Moses would be 6); 1 male 15 to 20 (Isaac Jr. would be 19); 1 male 20 to 30 (Abraham would be 21); 1 male 50 to 60 (Isaac would be 53); 1 female 5 to 10 (Anna would be 9); 2 females 10 to 15 (?); 1 female 40 to 50 (must be wife Maryan)

On NOvember 9, 1831, an entry was made in the Land Office records showing Isaac Morris purchased 82.75 acres, Range 8, Township 7, Section 25, in what is now Noble County, Marion Township (page 158). In 1831 this was still in Guernsey County.

In 1833 Isaac bought 80 acres of land from Henry Woodrow and his wife: Range 3, Township 1, Section 19. In 1833 he bought another 80 acres of land from David Brush and his wife: Range 3, Township 1, Section 18. In 1837 Isaac sold his son, Abraham Morris, 40 acres of the Range 3, Township 1, Section 18 for $200.00.Also in 1837, Isaac sold his other son, Isaac Jr., the other 40 acres of Range 3, Township 1, Section 18 for $200.00. In 1838 Isaac sold Isaac Wilson 80 acres being Range 3, Township 1, Section 19 for $800.00.

On April 27, 1838 Isaac purchased two parcels of land in Hocking County, Ohio. One parcel, 46 acres, was purchased from Josiah Cantwell and his wife, and the other, 45+ acres from Samuel Delong and his wife. Both deeds were made out to Isaac Morris only.Joseph Frazee, Isaac's son-in-law, witnessed both transactions. Both parcels are in Range 18, Township 12, Section 5.

The 1840 census show Isaac's family living in Laurel Township, 1 male 5 to 10; 1 male 10 to 15; 1 male 15 to 20 (Moses would be 16); 1 male 60 to 70 (Isaac would be 63); and 1 female 15 to 20 (Anna would be 19). In 1850 Isaac lived with is son, Moses, a farmer in Laurel Township, Hocking County, Ohio. He was listed as 72 years of age and place of birth as Pennsylvania.

Isaac diedd in April 1851 and is buried at Brown's Cemetary, on Buena Vista Road, Rockbridge, Ohio. He is buried with the Kost family. His youngest daughter, Anna married Ignacious (Nelson) Kost. In Isaac's last will and testament, he gave the "Plantation" where he was living to Moses and adjoining land to Anna Kost and her husband. The remaining children received $1.00 each besides what he had already given them. He sold Abraham and Isaac Jr. land in Guernsey County at a very low price. Isaac appointed Moses as the executer of his estate.

[NI5407] [Gearld.GED]

Sarah's father Isaac Morris sold all his land in Guernsey County in 1837/1838 and bought land in Hocking County in 1838. Sarah apparently moved to Hocking County about that time also.

Sarah married Ed Potter on September 6, 1839. Ed's parents may be Eli and Martha Potter from New Haven, Connecticut.

The 1840 census shows Ed living in Swan Township, Hocking County, 1 male under 5 (William was 1); 2 males 10 to 15 (Abrahan was 10 and Isaac was 12); 1 male 15 to 20 (William was 16); 1 male 40 to 50 (Ed was 43); 2 females 5 to 10 (Amanda was 7 and ?); 1 female 15 to 20 (could be Mary?); 1 female 30 to 40 (Sarah was 38).

Sarah and Samuel's children must have all moved to Hocking County about the same time their mother did. Marriage records show Mary Bigham marrying John Smyers in 1847; Isaac Bigham marrying Mary Elizabeth Delong in 1850; Abraham Bigham marrying Sarah Mann in 1851. Also in the 1850 census shows Margaret and John Botts; William and Hannah Bigham; Isaac and Mary Bigham; and Abraham Bigham all living in Hocking County.

The 1850 census also shows Ed, age 53, living in Good Hope Township; Sarah age 49; Amanda age 17 (Ed's daughter); William age 10; Nancy age 7; Eliza age 4; and Eli age 3. Thw 1860 census shows Ed age 64; Sarah age 59; Nancy age 17; Eliza age 15; and Eli age 13. The 1870 census shows Ed Potter, age 73, infirm, living next door to his son William in Good Hope Township.

Sarah died June 30, 1870. She is buried in Brown Cemetary, Hocking County, near her father, Isaac Morris and her son, Isaac Bigham. Sarah's grave marker was erected by her daughter, Mrs. William H. Huls, in September 1910. The date that Sarah married Ed on the marker is wrong. Sarah married Ed on September 6, 1839 as recorded in the marriage records in Logan, Ohio

[NI5408] [Gearld.GED]

Samuel came to the United States some time between 1806 and 1814 with his parents, a brother, James, and three sisters, Jane, Sarah, and Margaret. In Isaac's memoirs he told Eli that his father (Samuel) came to America when he was 9 or 10. That would have been 1809 or 1810.

Sarah (Samuel's wife) was apparently born in Washington County, Pennsylvania. Her father brought the family to Guernsey County sometime around 1812. Samuel married Sarah Morris in Guernsey County in 1812. Sarah's name on the marriage certificate is spelled Sally.

According to the 1830 census they lived in Richland Township, Guernsey County, Ohio. 1 male 30 to 40 (Samuel was 30); 1 female 30 to 40 (Sarah was 28); 2 females 5 to 10 (Margaret was 8); 2 males under 5 (William was 5 or 6 and Isaac was 2). Abraham was not born until August 30, 1830.

Samuel died in October 1836 in Guernsey County, Ohio. Eli Bigham, Samuels youngest grandson wrote that his father Isaac said Samuel had died as a result of taking an overdose of Calomel (mecurous chloride - used in medicine as a pergative and fungicide) and was buried near Byersville (just south of Cambridge, Ohio).

[NI5422] [Gearld.GED]

Eli Bigham, Isaac Bigham's youngest son, wrote from memory, some of the stories his father told. Isaac said he was born in the vicinity of Leather Bottoms, which is in Richland Township, Guernsey County. The 1830 census indicated the family lived in Richland Township. Isaac said after his father died (in 1836), he was vound out to a man near Byesville and after he got older, he ran away from this man's hame and walked to his Grandfather Morris's home in Hocking Coounty.

In 1848, at just over 20 years of age, Isaac purchased land in Hocking County, Ohio on what is now Bigham Road. Bigham Road runs between Ohio State Route #374 and Big Cola Road, but the old Bigham Road ran from Beuna Vista Road (between Big Cola Road and Little Cola Road) to Big Cola Road.

The 1850 census lists Isaac Bigham as a farmer, age 22; wife Mary, age 19; as living in Good Hope Township. The farm is valued at $700.00.

The 1860 census shows Isaac age 32, living in Laurel Township; Mary age 29; Abraham age 10; Samuel age 9; William age 7; Mary Ann age 6; Sarah age 4; and Eliza age 2.

The 1870 census shows Isaac age 42; Mary age 39; Abraham age 19; Samuel age 18; William age 16; Mary Ann age 15; Sarah age 12; Isaac W. age 10; Jacob age 8, Joseph age 6; Nelson age 5; Margaret age 3; and Elizabeth age 21 months. Margaret died in 1870 at 3 years of age in a field fire.

Isaac's wife, Mary Elizabeth Delong Bigham died in 1877. She is buried in th ebethany Church Cemetary on Middlefork Road near the Fairfield County line, near her sister Calista Ann Delong Kane.

The 1880 federal census shows Isaac at age 52; Sophia age 39; Jacob age 18; Joseph age 16; Nelson age 14; Elizabeth age 10. Isaac wWesley was 19 and did not live with his father. He apparently didn't get along with Sophia because when he got married at 20 years of age, his brother-in-law, James Fox, signed the marriage license as his legal guardian.

In 1895 Joseph Bigham and his brother-in-law, Oliver Benway died while digging a well.

Isaac Bigham died November 29, 1896 aat the age of 68 years, 3 months, 11 days, in Laurel Township. The cause of death was consumption (TB). He is buried in the Brown's cemetary on Buena Vista Road at Rockbridge, Ohio near his mother, Sarah Morris Bigham Potter and his Grandfather, Isaac Morris.

According to Isaac's will, all his personal property wa ssold and Sophia got $704.00; Abraham of Gibisonville got $106.00; Samuel of Gibisonville got $106.00; William of Elane Station, Texas got $106.00; Mary Ann Davis of Rockbridge got $106.00; Sarah Nixon of Ewing got $106.00; Wesley Bigham of Middle Fork got $106.00; Jacob of Middle Fork got $106.00; Nelson of Gibisonville got $106.00; Elizabeth D. Benway of Rockbridge got $106.00; Charles Bigham of Rock House got $106.00; Eli Bigham of Gibisonville got $106.00; Joseph was deceased but his children, Samuel Edson, Alva Melvin and Goldie Theresa, divided his share - $106.00.

[NI5423] [Gearld.GED]

Abraham was 6 years old when his father died. The 1850 census shows Abraham Bigham age 20, living in Hocking County, Goodhope Township with John and Elizabeth Weltner family. Abraham married Sarah Mann in Hocking County, Ohio in February, 1851. The 1860 census reveals Abraham living in Perry Township, age 30; Sarah age 26; Sarah Caroline age 8; John Wesley age 4; and Joseph W age 1.

[NI5444] [Gearld.GED]

The 1850 census shows Ignacious Kost being from Germany, living in Laurel Township, Hocking County, a farmer, age 28; wife Anna, born in Ohio, age 29; William 3; Mary 8 months; and John Botts, age 13. John could be Anna's nephew. John Botts married Margaret Bigham.

[NI5457] [Gearld.GED]

Died during childbirth at age 46.

[NI5461] [Gearld.GED]

Abraham was a farmer

[NI5465] [Gearld.GED]

Samuel and Charlotte are both buried in the Brown Cemetary, Buena Vista Road, Rockbridge, Ohio

[NI5472] [Gearld.GED]

Mary Ann and Levi are buried at Mt. Pisgah Church Cemetary, Buena Vista Road, Rockbridge, Ohio.

[NI5479] [Gearld.GED]

Isaac Wesley was born on Bigham Road in Hocking County, Ohio. Bigham Road is Laurel Township Road #112 and presently runs between Ohio State Route #374 and Big Cola Road, but when Isaac W. was born, Bigham Road ran from Big Cola Road to Buena Visat Road. That is where his parents had their farm. Isaac Wesley purchased a farm on Buena Vista Toad, near Little Cola Road.

Isaac Wesley's mother died whe he was 16 years old, and then his father, Isaac, married Sophia Julian about one year later. Apparently Isaac Wesley did not get along with Sophia because the 1880 census shows Isaac as 52; Sophia as 39; Jacob as 18; Joseph as 16; Nelson as 14; and Elizabeth as 10. Also he was twenty years of age when he and Zelda Clapper were married and his brother-in-law, James Fox, signed their marriage license as Isaac Wesley's guardian. The were married by Levi Davis. Zelda was raised on what is now Clapper Hollow Road which is near Mound Crossing and runs to Buena Vista Road.

The 1900 census shows Isaac Wesley lived in Laurel Township, age 39; Zelda age 42; James age 18; Henry age 15; John Wesley age 13; Edward age 11; Bertha age 8; Mary age 6; and Ethel age 4. The 1904/1905 Fairfield County Directory lists Isaac Wesley and Zelda as living at 409 North Maple, Lancaster, Ohio. Also Henry listed as a Teamster, James as a Laborer, and John as a Shoeworker.

The 1910 census shows Isaac Wesley , age 48, living in Perry Township, Hocking County; Zelda age 52; John W. age 23; Edward age 21; Ethel age 14.

The 1920 census shows Isaac Wesley Bigham, age 57, living in Perry Township, Hocking County; Zelda age 61; son John age 32.

Zelda died November 2,, 1922 at 64 years, 10 months, 28 days. The primary cause of death was Mitral Regurgitation. Her mother's name on her death certificate is Priscilla Bowman. Zelda's last name on the death certificate is spelled Bingham.

Isaac Wesley died February 1, 1923. He and Zelda are buried in the Pisgah Church Cemetary, Buena Vista Road, Rockbridge, Ohio.

[NI5488] [Gearld.GED]

The 1900 federal census shows Jacob, age 37, a farmer, living in Laurel Township, Hocking County; Rachel age 36; Villa age 18; Lillie age 15; Hulda age 12; Daniel age 10; Alva age 8; Maudie age 6; Ada age 4; Harvey age 2; and Fleetie age 6 months.

The 1920 census shows Jacob, age 57, still living in Lauerl Township; Rachel age 56.

Jacob died August 20, 1928 in Hocking County, Ohio. He was 65 years 9 months and 17 days old. The primary cause of death was septicemia; the secondary cause being rectal abcess.

[NI5500] [Gearld.GED]

Joseph and his brother-in-law, Oliver Benway (Elizabeth Della Bigham's first husband) died while diggig a water well. Joseph and Anna are both buried in the Mt. Pisgah Church Cemetary, Buena Vista Road, Rockbridge, Ohio

[NI5504] [Gearld.GED]

Margaret died at 3 years of age in a field fire.

[NI5505] [Gearld.GED]

The 1900 federal census reveals Andrew Roop was head of the house, age 32; Elizabeth age 30; Lydia D. (step-daughter) age 14; Lauretta (step-daughter_ age 11; Minnie AA. (step-daughter) age 7; Nettie H (step-daughter) age 5; and Martin age 2.

[NI5531] [Gearld.GED]

Perry's Great Great Grandparents were natives of Wales. His Great Graet Grandmother belonged to the nobility of Wales. They eloped, as it was forbidden to marry with a commoner. NOTE: Last name Daniel is often misspelled by adding an "s" to the end.

[NI5534] [Gearld.GED]

Allen was a minister at the Ojai, California Presbyterian church (1886-1889). He also had a church in New York before that.

[NI5536] [Gearld.GED]

Took over the care of William T. Daniel's children when Grandpa Wilson died.

[NI5678] The 1820 British settler known for setting slaves free in South Africa - he went by James and Jamestown in SA is named after him. The Kidwell memorial church is also there.

[NI5834] The Murray family, an old established family who had lived for generations on a farm called "Cockpul" (pronounced couple). Cockpul and West Cockpul an ancient fort and farm locations respectively and still exist 1 miles west of the coastal parish and village of Ruthwell, Dumfries, Scotland. Murray of Cockpool/Cockpul received Free Barony 1507/8. Dates from Crown Charter of Free Barony of Scottish Families. Source film 0277984 Scotland, Nobility

[NI5836] Died in Infancy

[NI5839] Died in infancy

[NI5840] Died in infancy

[NI5841] Died in infancy

[NI5844] John and Mary and their children sailed in the "Mandarin" to New Zealand, arriving in Wellington on Christmas Day 1841. Mary Jane Gilfillan remembered there was an earthquake which occurred when the boat was in mid-ocean. The family did not proceed to Wanganui immediately on their arrival in Wellington. By early 1842 they had moved to Wanganui, sailing in a small 10 ton boat "Catherine Johnson". In 1847 Mr Gilfillan's farmhouse at Matarawa was attacked by a party of six Maori youths. Mrs Gilfillan and three children were killed and later another daughter and a grand-daughter died of injuries. Mr Gilfillan wore a throat cover to hide the scar caused by the severe tomahawk wound he received in his neck and his daughter Mary had scars from tomahawk wounds on her forehead. Mr Gilfillan was an artist of considerable talent and his pencil sketches and oil paintings are important records of early New Zealand and Australia.1st cousin of John Alexander Gilfillan.

[NI5847] Mary was badly hurt in the Gilfillan massacre on 18/4/1847, but survived. In November 1847 she went to Australia with her father, younger
sister and brother

[NI5850] Drowned on Lake Rotorua, New Zealand, by the upsetting of a canoe which was capsized in a gale between Ohinemutu and the Island of Mokoia. John escaped being hurt in the massacre by jumping in to a ditch and he slept the night in the bracken ferns with his sister Sarah. At day-break they walked towards the two and were met by a party of settlers. After refreshments they were taken to Putuki Mission and carried by Hoani Wirimu Hipango

[NI5851] Sarah also escaped the massacre but was hurt on her shoulder. Sarah, John, their father and older sister Mary went to Australia in November 1847.

[NI5854] She was in the massacre, but not physically hurt

[NI5855] Twin of Christopher Gilfillan

[NI5882] Fleetwood and his party found the first diamond on 16/7/1871 at Kimberley, South Africa

[NI5891] James Allison graduated from the University of Glasgow, M.D. 1839. Emigrated to New Zealand in 1842, settled in Wanganui, where he engaged in sheep farming with success.

[NI5892] This baby was in the massacre, although not hurt, died 2 months later. He was at the farm at the time and his parents in the town.

[NI5912] The investiture of Col. C. D. Griffith by His Excellency the Governor Sir H. Bartle Frere, Bart, G.C.B., G.C.S.I., etc . with the insignia as a Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George took place in King Williams Town on January 19, 1878 in token of appreciation by Queen Victoria' s Government for long and meritorious service.

[NI5921] Alfred and Helen had no children.

[NI6004] Craig & Les were married in the garden of Les' parents. The reception was held at the Meikles Hotel. For their honeymoon Craig & Les went to the Eastern Highlands; specifically to the Vumba (The Impala Arms), and Nyanga.
[Gearld.GED]

They moved from Ciccinnati to North Vernon, Indiana, then to Greensburg due to George's job as engineer on the Big 4 railroads
Married by Rev. William Shaw
This marriage was the first European wedding in Wanganui, New Zealand. James Allison graduated from the University of Glasgow, M.D. 1839. Emigrated to New Zealand in 1842, settled in Wanganui, where he engaged in sheep farming with success.

[NS36961] Augustus_England2.FTW, Source Medium: Other
.

[NS37761] Valerie Martin.

[NS37771] Weapons Of Peace.

[NS37121] Barkly East Reporter.

[NS37131] Birth Certificate.

[NS37141] Birth Records Index.

[NS37151] British Vital Records Index.

[NS37161] Christian Schoultz.

[NS37171] Craig Dodge.

[NS37181] Craig Geoffrey Dodge.

[NS37191] David Robin Thorne.

[NS37201] David Robin Thornes Birth Certificate.

[NS37211] David Thorne.

[NS37221] Death Certificate.

[NS37231] Elaine Rosemary Dodge.

[NS37241] Gearld.GED, Source Medium: Other
.

[NS37251] Geoff Dodge.

[NS37261] Geoffrey Gilfillan Dodge.

[NS37271] Gilfillan Family Tree.

[NS37281] Hugh Robertson.

[NS37291] Hugh Thornes Will.

[NS37301] IGI.

[NS37311] James Matthew Dodges Birth Certificate.

[NS37321] Jean Talent, Source Medium: Book
.

[NS37331] Joan Cecil Gilfillan, Source Medium: Book
.

[NS37341] Judy Ralph.FTW, Source Medium: Other
.

[NS37351] Laura Havenga.

[NS37361] Laura Wrigley.

[NS37371] Lesmeri Heather Thorne.

[NS37391] Mark Dalby.

[NS37401] Marriage Certificate.

[NS37381] Lylie Marie Lifton.

[NS37421] Maryanne Thorne, Source Medium: Book
.

[NS37431] Michael Hugh Thorne.

[NS37441] Mormon Ancestral File.

[NS37411] Mary Twinch.

[NS37461] Murray Martin.

[NS37471] Murrays Birth Certificate.

[NS37481] National Archives - Zimbabwe.

[NS37491] Newspaper Condolences.

[NS37501] Parish Recods.

[NS37511] Patricia Dodge (Slocombe).

[NS37521] Patricia Mary Thorne.

[NS37531] Patrick Dodge.

[NS37541] Ray Dodge.

[NS37551] Rhodesia's Pioneer Women.

[NS37561] Rosar Gaitsmith, Source Medium: Book
.

[NS37571] Roy Dodge.

[NS37581] Sue Munro.

[NS37591] Sumei Yang.

[NS37601] Sylvia Heggie.

[NS37451] Mormon Scottish Church Records.

[NS36901] 1841 census, Source Medium: Book
.

[NS36911] 1871 Census.

[NS36921] Alexis Gunther Helm Death Notice.

[NS36931] Alexis Patricia Hepburn.

[NS36941] Anne Webb Letter.

[NS36951] Annie Helm Death Notice.

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